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Who was louis braille book

Who was louis braille book

Ethan’s daily book look #281: october 7, 2016 (six dots: a

A bright young boy who lost his sight as an infant a professional guitarist The blind reading code was invented by a teen, and it is still used today. Louis Braille was not your usual adolescent. He was just fifteen years old when he developed a reading machine that turned written words into columns of raised dots. He had been blind since the age of four. Braille introduced the blind to the world of books by touch, and no one has ever built on his easy, genius idea nearly two centuries later.
Louis Braille was not your usual adolescent. He was just fifteen years old when he developed a reading machine that turned written words into columns of raised dots. He had been blind since the age of four. Braille introduced the blind to the world of books by touch, and no one has ever built on his easy, genius idea nearly two centuries later.

“great inventors: louis braille” by adventure academy

Louis Braille (/brel/ (listen); French: [lwi baj]; 4 January 1809 – 6 January 1852) was a blind or visually impaired French educator and inventor of a reading and writing device. His system has remained largely unchanged since its invention, and is commonly known as braille around the world.
After being blinded in one eye at the age of three due to an accident with a sewing awl in his father’s harness shop, an infection formed and spread to both eyes, resulting in complete blindness.
1st Despite the fact that there were few opportunities for the blind at the time, he excelled in school and was awarded a scholarship to France’s Royal Institute for Blind Youth. He began designing a tactile code system that would allow blind people to read and write easily and efficiently while still a student there. Inspired by Charles Barbier’s military cryptography, Braille devised a new approach tailored to the needs of the blind. In 1824, he gave his first public presentation of his work to his peers.

Young heroes: louis braille (with captions and description

Louis Braille, then three years old, was playing in his father’s harness shop next to the family’s house in the small village of Coupvray, France, in 1812. His father was a master harness maker in the area. For the villagers’ horses, Mr. Braille often made reins, saddles, and collars. He used sharp tools to cut leather strips and poke holes in the leather. Louis had been warned not to play with the shop’s equipment because he was too young.
Mr. Braille went outside the shop that day to assist a client. Like his father, Louis figured he’d try punching a hole in a piece of leather. He took the tool in his hand and attempted to drive it through the leather. He didn’t have his father’s power. He tried again, this time with more force. The tool flew up and into his left eye as it slipped from his fingers. Louis screamed in excruciating agony. His parents, two sisters, and brother all rushed over to assist him.
They covered his eye with a rag. In Coupvray, there was no hospital. The nearest doctor was a long way away. They brought Louis to a village woman who treated accidents and illnesses with herbal medicines. She applied a wet herbal solution to a cloth bandage and put it over Louis’ eye. However, his wounded eye developed an infection, which spread to his other eye. Louis lost both eyesight in a short period of time and remained blind for the rest of his life.

History living book: out of darkness louis braille story

Louis Braille was not your usual adolescent. He was just fifteen years old when he developed a reading machine that turned written words into columns of raised dots. He had been blind since the age of four. Braille introduced the blind to the world of books by touch, and no one has ever built on his easy, genius idea nearly two centuries later.
Louis had an accident in his father’s workshop when he was three years old, resulting in permanent blindness in both eyes. Braille, it is said, didn’t know he had lost his sight at first and always inquired as to why it was so dark. With canes made specifically for him by his aunt, he learned to navigate the village and countryside.
Captain Charles Barbier of the French Army invented a communication device, which Braille learned about in 1821. He devised a method of “night writing,” which consisted of a code of dots and dashes imprinted on thick paper. As a result, soldiers could read in the dark without having to shout over each other. Braille thought it was too difficult for daily usage, so he created his own.