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Which statement describes the motion of earth around the sun

Which statement describes the motion of earth around the sun

If it is summer in the northern hemisphere, which statement is true?

A planet’s orbit around the Sun (or a satellite’s orbit around a planet) isn’t a circular circle. It’s an ellipse, which is a “flattened” disk. One of the ellipse’s foci is the Sun (or the planet’s center). One of the two internal points that determines the shape of an ellipse is the focus. The distance between one focus and every point on the ellipse, as well as the distance between one focus and the second focus, is always the same.
The orbital speed of a planet varies depending on its distance from the Sun. The greater the Sun’s gravitational force on a planet and the faster it travels, the closer it is to the Sun. The weaker the Sun’s gravitational force becomes the farther it is from the Sun, and the slower it travels in its orbit.
Eccentricity is a measurement of an orbit’s “roundness.” The eccentricity of a perfectly circular orbit is zero; higher numbers suggest more elliptical orbits. The planets with the least eccentric orbits in our solar system are Neptune, Venus, and Earth. The most eccentric orbits are those of Mercury and Pluto, the dwarf planet.

Which is a major source of air pollution created by humans?

Explanation: Gravity causes stars, planets, moons, and other objects in space to circle each other. The term for this form of motion is revolution. In space, several objects rotate in place. Rotation is the term for this action. The cycle of an Earth day is equal to one Earth rotation, which is why we have night and day. A year is the length of one Earth revolution around the sun. Since they rotate and revolve at various speeds, other planets have different day and year lengths.
Our solar system’s planets all revolve around the sun in the same direction. With the exception of Uranus and Venus, they all rotate in the same direction. Half of the galaxies in the universe rotate in a clockwise direction, while the other half rotate in a counterclockwise direction. This may be due to the way our universe started, according to scientists.
Explanation: “All of these” is the correct answer.
Gravity causes stars, planets, asteroids, and other objects in space to circle each other. The term for this form of motion is revolution. In space, several objects rotate in place. Rotation is the term for this action.

Which of these statements best explains the shape of earth?

Consider a line that runs through the middle of the Earth and passes through both the North and South Poles. An axis is the name given to this imaginary line. The Earth rotates around its axis in the same way as a top rotates around its spindle. The rotation of the Earth is the name given to this rotating motion. The Earth orbits or revolves around the Sun at the same time it turns on its axis. Revolution is the name given to this movement. A pendulum in motion will not change its motion, and its swinging path does not change as well. Foucault did note, however, that his pendulum seemed to change course. He deduced that the Earth under the pendulum was moving because the pendulum could not alter its motion. Earth takes 23 hours, 56 minutes, and 4 seconds to complete one complete rotation on its axis, as seen from space. However, since Earth rotates and shifts around the Sun at the same time, the planet must turn slightly more to reach the same position relative to the Sun. As a result, a day on Earth is actually 24 hours long. The Earth rotates at a speed of around 1,700 km per hour near the equator, but hardly moves at all at the poles.

Which is associated with an increase of chlorofluorocarbons in the environment

The Geographic North Pole, also known as the Terrestrial North Pole, is the location in the Northern Hemisphere where the Earth’s axis of rotation meets its surface. This position is not to be confused with Earth’s North Magnetic Pole. In Antarctica, the South Pole is the other point where the Earth’s axis of rotation intersects the surface.
In relation to the Sun, Earth rotates once every 24 hours, 56 minutes, and 4 seconds, but once every 23 hours, 56 minutes, and 4 seconds in relation to other, distant stars (see below). Since the Earth’s rotation slows slightly over time, a day used to be shorter. This is due to the Moon’s tidal impact on Earth’s rotation. Atomic clocks show that a modern day is around 1.7 milliseconds longer than a century ago,[1] indicating that the pace at which UTC is changed by leap seconds is gradually growing. The length of a day has risen around 2.3 milliseconds per century since the 8th century BCE, according to historical astronomical records. [two] According to scientists, the Earth began spinning faster in 2020 after steadily slowing for decades. Engineers all over the world are debating a ‘negative leap second’ and other potential timekeeping solutions as a result. [three]