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Which statement best reflects the purpose of satire?

Which statement best reflects the purpose of satire?

Which example would most likely be considered satirical

Satire is a literary genre, as well as the visual and performing arts, in which vices, follies, crimes, and flaws are mocked, preferably with the aim of pressuring people, businesses, governments, or culture as a whole to change. While satire is typically intended to be satirical, its primary goal is also to provide constructive social critique by using wit to draw attention to both specific and broader social issues.
Powerful irony or sarcasm is a characteristic of satire—”in satire, irony is militant”—but parody, burlesque, exaggeration, juxtaposition, contrast, analogy, and double entendre are also common in satirical speech and writing. The satirist’s “militant” irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least embrace as natural) the very things he intends to criticize.
The term satire is derived from the Latin word satur and the expression lanx satura, which means “saturated lanx.” Satur originally meant “full,” but when combined with lanx, it became “miscellaneous or medley”: lanx satura literally means “a full dish of different kinds of fruits.”

How are satire and sarcasm the same

Satire is a genre of the visual, literary, and performing arts in which vices, follies, abuses, and flaws are mocked with the aim of pressuring people, businesses, governments, or society as a whole to change.

Which rhetorical element is used in this example

1st Although satire is usually intended to be humorous, its primary goal is often to provide constructive social criticism by employing wit to draw attention to both specific and broader social issues.
Powerful irony or sarcasm is a characteristic of satire —”in satire, irony is militant,” writes literary critic Northrup Frye—[2], but parody, burlesque, exaggeration, juxtaposition, contrast, analogy, and double entendre are also common in satirical speech and writing. This “aggressive” irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least embrace as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to criticize.
The term satire is derived from the Latin word satur and the expression lanx satura, which means “saturated lanx.” Satur originally meant “full,” but when combined with lanx, it became “miscellaneous or medley”: lanx satura literally means “a full dish of different kinds of fruits.” [number four]

Which scenario is an example of irony

Elizabethan authors, keen to pursue Classical models but fooled by a false etymology, assumed that satyre originated from the Greek satyr play: satyrs were notoriously rude, unmannerly creatures, it seemed to follow that the word satyre should mean something harsh, coarse, rough. The false etymology that derives satire from satyrs was finally revealed in the 17th century by Classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, but the old tradition has aesthetic if not etymological appropriateness and has remained solid, according to English author Joseph Hall.
More than a century later, Juvenal sees the satirist’s position in a different light. His most recognizable pose is that of an upright man, horrified by the corruptions of his day, his heart filled with rage and frustration. What motivates him to write satire? Since tragedies and epics aren’t important to his generation. Viciousness and corruption pervade Roman life to such an extent that it is impossible for an honest writer not to write satire. When he looks around, his heart swells with rage; vice has never triumphed more. How can he be deafeningly quiet (Satires, I)? Juvenal’s declamatory style, as well as the amplification and luxuriousness of his invective, are completely at odds with Horace’s stylistic prescriptions. Juvenal flaunts his creativity at the end of the scabrous sixth satire, a long, perfervid invective against women: “In this poem, satire has gone beyond the limits set by his predecessors; it has taken to itself the exalted tone of tragedy,” he says.

Why was satire popular among 18th-century english writers

Alexander Pope wrote The Rape of the Lock, which was first published in 1712 and then reworked and republished in 1714. The poem is a mock-epic that mocks London’s upper crust at the time. The lead character, Belinda, has a lock of hair cut off at a social party, and the plot revolves around her. While it might seem insignificant to others, Belinda is enraged that the Baron has cut her strand of hair. Pope uses Belinda and the Baron to ridicule two of his acquaintances, Arabella Fermor and Lord Petre, in the Rape of the Lock. The poem recounts the events of the previous night, culminating in Belinda’s “horrific” defeat.
In response to a letter from his friend John Caryll, an influential Roman Catholic at the time, Pope wrote The Rape of the Lock. Caryll demonstrated that a lock of Arabella Fermor’s hair had been cut off by his uncle, Lord Petre. The families had been feuding since the incident. Pope wrote The Rape of the Lock to make fun of the situation. “The theft of Miss Belle Fermor’s hair was taken too seriously, and it created a rift between the two families, despite the fact that they had previously shared a long friendship. A mutual friend and well-wisher for both asked me to compose a poem in their honor, so they could laugh together once more. The Rape of the Lock was written with this viewpoint in mind.” (1.)