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Which scientist proposed the first formal theory of continental drift

Which scientist proposed the first formal theory of continental drift

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Alfred Wegener is most closely connected with the theory of continental drift. Wegener published a paper in the early twentieth century describing his hypothesis that continental landmasses were “drifting” across the World, often plowing across oceans and colliding with one another. He coined the term “continental drift” to explain this pattern.
Wegener, an astronomer by training, described Pangaea and continental drift using biology, botany, and geology. Fossils of the ancient reptile Mesosaurus, for example, have only been discovered in southern Africa and South America. Mesosaurus, a one-meter-long (3.3-foot-long) freshwater reptile, may not have swum the Atlantic Ocean. Mesosaurus’ existence indicates a single ecosystem with multiple lakes and rivers.
Wegener also researched plant fossils from Svalbard, Norway’s icy Arctic archipelago. These plants were not hardy enough to withstand the harsh conditions of the Arctic. These fossils belonged to tropical plants, which are adapted to a much warmer and more humid climate. These fossils show that Svalbard once had a tropical climate.

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The development of the continental drift hypothesis prior to 1958 is the subject of this paper. See plate tectonics for the modern theory. Continental Drift is a novel by Russell Banks (novel). Ice Age: Continental Drift is the fourth film in the Ice Age franchise.
The break-up of the last supercontinent, Pangaea, and the subsequent movements of its constituents; Early Triassic epoch to present Continental drift is the hypothesis that the Earth’s continents have moved relative to each other over geologic time, thereby appearing to have “drifted” across the globe.
1st Abraham Ortelius proposed the notion that continents had ‘drifted’ for the first time in 1596. Alfred Wegener independently and more thoroughly formulated the idea in 1912, but his theory was dismissed by many due to the lack of a motive mechanism. Mantle convection was later suggested as a mechanism by Arthur Holmes. The theory of plate tectonics, which describes how continents shift by riding on plates of the Earth’s lithosphere, has since supplanted continental drift. [two]

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Continental drift is the rotation of the Earth’s continents relative to one another, giving the impression that they are “drifting” across the ocean floor.

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[2] Abraham Ortelius proposed the concept of continents ‘drifting’ for the first time in 1596. Alfred Wegener independently and more thoroughly formulated the idea in 1912, but his theory was ignored by some due to the lack of a method, which was later provided by Arthur Holmes. The theory of plate tectonics, which describes how continents shift, has absorbed the concept of continental drift. [three]
Others, like Abraham Ortelius Template:Harv, Theodor Christoph Lilienthal (1756), Alexander von Humboldt (1801 and 1845), Antonio Snider-Pellegrini Template:Harv, and others, had noticed that the shapes of continents on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean (most notably, Africa and South America) seem to match together.
[number six] Ortelius’ thoughts were identified by W. J. Kious as follows: [7] “It was formerly a very general idea, even among geologists, that the great features of the earth’s surface, no less than the smaller ones, were subject to continual mutations, and that during the course of recorded geological time the continents and great oceans had again and again traded places with each other,” Alfred Russel Wallace wrote in 1889. “Continents, therefore, while permanent for entire geological epochs, change their positions entirely over the course of ages,” he quotes Charles Lyell as saying. [9] and says that James Dwight Dana, in 1849, was the first to cast doubt on it.

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If there were a “geographical projection,” similar to meteorologists’ forecasts, it would demonstrate how the Atlantic Ocean would continue to grow for the next 100 million years, until it is much larger than the Pacific. Also, how Africa and Europe will merge, with the Mediterranean vanishing and a new mountain range rising to compete with the Himalayas—though Everest and its neighbouring mountains will continue to rise. If this sounds surprising now, imagine how geologists felt in 1912 when a 32-year-old German meteorologist named Alfred Wegener revealed his theory of continental drift. Every child today knows that the continents are slowly shifting and were joined together when the dinosaurs first emerged, thanks to his theory.
Many people have noted how well Brazil fits snugly under the belly of Africa since the first world maps were released. Other contacts were sought by Alfred Wegener (1 November 1880 – November 1930). He discovered studies on similar fossils found on the coasts of Africa and South America, something for which geologists had given a more implausible explanation: land bridges that had disappeared since allowing animals and plants to migrate from one continent to another.