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Which president started his own newspaper in order to get his message out?

Which president started his own newspaper in order to get his message out?

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The Pentagon Papers, also known as the Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force, is a US Department of Defense summary of the US political and military participation in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Daniel Ellsberg, who had worked on the report, published the findings, which were first brought to the public’s attention on the front page of The New York Times in 1971. 1st [two] The Pentagon Papers, according to a 1996 report in The New York Times, showed that the Johnson administration “systematically lied, not just to the public but also to Congress.” [three]
With bombings of neighboring Cambodia and Laos, coastal raids on North Vietnam, and Marine Corps attacks—none of which were publicized in the mass media—the United States secretly expanded the scale of its actions in the Vietnam War. Ellsberg was originally charged with conspiracy, espionage, and theft of government property for his leak of the Pentagon Papers; however, charges were later dropped after prosecutors investigating the Watergate controversy found that Nixon White House staff members had directed the so-called White House Plumbers to participate in illegal attempts to undermine Ellsberg. [number four] (5)

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The Pentagon Papers, also known as the Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force, is a US Department of Defense summary of the US political and military participation in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Daniel Ellsberg, who had worked on the report, published the findings, which were first brought to the public’s attention on the front page of The New York Times in 1971. 1st [two] The Pentagon Papers, according to a 1996 report in The New York Times, showed that the Johnson administration “systematically lied, not just to the public but also to Congress.” [three]
With bombings of neighboring Cambodia and Laos, coastal raids on North Vietnam, and Marine Corps attacks—none of which were publicized in the mass media—the United States secretly expanded the scale of its actions in the Vietnam War. Ellsberg was originally charged with conspiracy, espionage, and theft of government property for his leak of the Pentagon Papers; however, charges were later dropped after prosecutors investigating the Watergate controversy found that Nixon White House staff members had directed the so-called White House Plumbers to participate in illegal attempts to undermine Ellsberg. [number four] (5)

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“I’d like to express my gratitude to all of you for the courtesy you’ve shown me, and I’d like to encourage you to keep doing your best to unearth the truth and present them to the public. Naturally, not every newspaper agrees with me, and I do not agree with every newspaper. Regardless of these differences, I believe it is critical for our democratic system of government that any channel of communication between people and their government, especially the President, remain open as much as possible.” This type of press conference, in which reporters can ask the President of the United States any question they want, demonstrates how powerful and vital our democracy is. There is no other country in the world where the president is subjected to such unrestricted interrogation. I also know from personal experience that standing up here and trying to answer ‘off the cuff’ all sorts of questions without any prior notice is difficult. Perhaps future presidents will be able to find ways to strengthen and protect the practice. I genuinely hope that they would never cut off direct contact with the people.

I escaped north korea. here’s my message for president

Warren G. Harding was the 29th President of the United States, and he was an Ohio Republican (1921-1923). Despite his tumultuous presidency, which included the Teapot Dome affair, Harding welcomed technology and was attentive to the plight of minorities and women.
“America’s present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolt, but restoration; not rebellion, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in victorious nationality,” Warren G. Harding proclaimed before his nomination.
Harding’s speeches were dubbed “an army of pompous phrases rolling around the landscape in search of an idea” by a Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo. Their obscurity served because, in contrast to the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harding’s pronouncements on the League of Nations remained vague.