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Which best describes the texture of this excerpt?

Which best describes the texture of this excerpt?

Lecture 7.2: josh mcdermott – introduction to audition, part 2

One of the fundamental elements of music is texture. When you talk about a piece of music’s texture, you’re talking about how much is going on in the music at any given time. The music’s texture, for example, may be dense or thin, with several or few layers.
It may be made up entirely of rhythm, a melody line with chordal accompaniment, or a series of intertwining melodies. Below are some of the formal terminology musicians use to describe texture, as well as some ideas for explaining the concept of musical texture and these terms to young students.
The texture of a piece of music can be defined in a variety of ways (thick, thin, bass-heavy, rhythmically complex, and so on), but the formal words for texture all refer to the relationships between melodies and harmonies. The four main types of texture are described and illustrated here. Please see the Activity section below for unique pieces of music that are good examples of each type of texture.

Siegfried: excerpt from act iii

Monophony, polyphony, and homophony are the three musical textures we will experience during our studies. Since texture will be a factor in recognizing pieces from all periods in music history, you’ll want to research this content thoroughly. You’ll find links to three pieces to listen to at the end of the reading assignment; see if you can recognise the textures of the pieces based on your reading.
One of the fundamental elements of music is texture. If you talk about the texture of a piece of music, you’re talking about how melodic and (sometimes) harmonic components connect with one another. The music’s texture, for example, may be dense or thin, with several or few layers. It may be made up entirely of rhythm, a melody line with chordal accompaniment, or a series of intertwining melodies. Some of the formal words musicians use to describe texture are mentioned below.
The texture of a piece of music can be defined in a number of ways (thick, thin, bass-heavy, rhythmically complex, and so on), but the formal terms all apply to the relationships between melodies and, if present, harmonies. The three key textures you will encounter in our class are described and illustrated below.

Texture with music answer example

The texture of a piece of music is determined by how the tempo, melodic, and harmonic materials are mixed in a musical composition, which determines the overall quality of the sound. The density, or thickness, and range, or distance, between lowest and highest pitches, are often defined in relative terms, as well as more precisely distinguished according to the number of voices, or parts, and the relationship between these voices (see Common types below). A dense texture, for example, has many ‘layers’ of instruments. A string section or another brass section may be one of these layers. The amount and richness of the instruments playing the piece also affects the thickness. From thin to dense, the thickness varies.
The number and character of parts played at once, the timbre of the instruments or voices playing these parts, and the harmony, tempo, and rhythms used can all affect the texture of a piece.
[two] Primary textural elements are labeled and evaluated to establish the forms categorized by number and relationship of parts: primary melody (PM), secondary melody (SM), parallel supporting melody (PSM), static support (SS), harmonic support (HS), rhythmic support (RS), and harmonic and rhythmic support (RS) (HRS). [three]

Textures/chaos (excerpt) – of sound, mind and body

Stephanie Mccallum has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment, and does not work for, consult, own shares in, or receive support from any corporation or organization that would benefit from this article.
Clair de Lune, the best-known piano piece by French composer Claude Debussy, has become well-known as a result of its frequent success. Its roots are complicated and interesting, integrating influences from poetry, Baroque music (from about 1600 to 1750), and Impressionism, a musical form that grew out of the visual arts movement.
The title, which means “moonlight,” was added shortly before the piece was published in 1905 as the third movement of a four-movement suite called Suite Bergamasque. Debussy’s beloved daughter, Claude-Emma, also known as Chouxchoux, was born the same year.
The title comes from Symbolist poet Paul Verlaine’s poem of the same name, published in 1869. Debussy had previously set this poem, as well as 18 other Verlaine poems, for voice and piano. “Au calme clair de lune triste et beau,” the poem states (the still moonlight sad and lovely).