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What narrative point of view is used in speaking of courage

What narrative point of view is used in speaking of courage

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The Stuff They Brought were told from two different viewpoints. The title story, as well as many others, was written in the first person, from Tim’s point of view. Tim narrates all of the novels, but he is not the protagonist of any of them. Tim tells many stories in which he tries to explain how his experiences in Vietnam changed him when attempting to memorialize his platoon mates by sharing their stories. The other point of view, as in the title story, is third person omniscient, which enables O’Brien to share the thoughts of many of the novel’s characters, including Kiowa, Lt. Cross, and Rat. By using the third person, O’Brien is able to include stories that Tim’s character may not be aware of firsthand. The book is a personal account of a common experience because of the synthesis of the two points of view.

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“SPEAKING With COURAGE” (Chapter 15)

All about writing in first person

In “Speaking with Courage,” what narrative point of view is used? When Norman returns home, what problems does he face? What seems to be stopping him from successfully dealing with them? What is the meaning of the title “Speaking of Courage” in this story? Assume there is no irony in the title. What does this tale have to do with courage? Norman Bowker, like the other male characters in the book, establishes an active fantasy life. Why do these men take on these fictitious personas? What do they learn by telling themselves these fantastical tales? What does this suggest about O’Brien’s interpretation of the relationship between fiction and reality? Why can’t Norman communicate with someone at home? What’s more, why doesn’t he even try?
“NOTES” (Chapter 16) What is the impact of O’Brien’s “Notes,” in which he describes the backstory of “Speaking Of Courage”? Is it possible that knowing which parts of the story are “real” and which are the author’s creation will change your opinion of it? Why is Norman’s letter included in O’Brien’s story? In “Notes,” what does O’Brien have to say about storytelling?

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Norman Bowker has returned home after the war. He’s driving his father’s Chevy around the lake’s seven-mile loop on the Fourth of July. The town seems to be the same. Bowker used to drive around the same lake with his girlfriend Sally Kramer late at night in high school, or he would drive with friends and spend the trip debating whether or not God existed. Then there was the fighting. The lake, on the other hand, had always been there. Bowker got a bad ear infection from the lake water after high school, which almost stopped him from going to Vietnam. He didn’t go to the war because his friend Max Arnold drowned in the lake.
Norman has returned a completely different individual, but nothing about his background has changed in a way that would make it easier for him to reintegrate into society. Consistency, on the other hand, has certain benefits. The lake had always been there, but it had taken Max Arnold, a friend who would undoubtedly listen to Norman after the war when he needed someone to talk to.

Look to god for courage (a powerful word of

Norman Bowker, like the other male characters in the book, establishes an active fantasy life. Why do these men take on these fictitious personas? What do they learn by telling themselves these fantastical tales? What does this suggest about O’Brien’s interpretation of the relationship between fiction and reality?
Despite the fact that this chapter moved at a slow pace, it is still a great example of what can happen to an individual after the war. Norman Bowker is a fascinating example, as he pondered if he could have earned the Silver Star award if he had saved Kiowa. This makes the reader wonder whether he wanted to save Kiowa solely for the award or because he was a friend; he did express sorrow and compassion for Kiowa and the deplorable field situation. The ending was thought-provoking because it was revealed that Norman committed suicide; there may be a number of reasons for this, such as the life he had after the war or the fact that the people in his life were uninterested in him and the war. The most perplexing part of the chapter, however, is when Tim says, “Norman is back in the story, where he belongs, and I don’t think he’d mind if his real name appeared… After all, Kiowa had been a close friend, and I’d avoided thinking about his death and my part in it for years… I want to be clear that Norman Bowker has nothing to do with what happened to Kiowa. Norman didn’t have a nervous breakdown that night. He didn’t lose the Silver Star for valor because he didn’t freeze up. That section of the story is entirely mine” (O’Brien #). Anything makes the reader doubt what is true and what isn’t.