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What happens when a man eats period blood

What happens when a man eats period blood

What happens when a man eats period blood

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Blood, uterine lining, and normal vaginal discharge make up menstrual fluids. They aren’t poisonous or bad in any way. They’re nothing more than anything that comes out of the vaginal canal, and they’re completely normal and stable.
The average person loses between 30 and 40 milliliters of blood over the course of a week, which isn’t much. If you cut the time down to the twenty minutes or so you’ll be down, you’ll just be left with a few smudges of blood – unless the person you’re going down on has a very strong flow.
When you get oral while on your period, you get the most out of all that period horniness (yes, a lot of us are extra turned on at our period time, it’s not just you) and the residual feelings of “is this okay?” Is this something that anyone else is doing?’ making it sound a little taboo.
Isn’t this a pleasant change from telling them to just go down on you while they’re menstruating? And it makes up for all the times you considered anal because you weren’t allowed to have oral sex during shark week.

“For all my lovers and male mates, I have used menstrual blood and vaginal fluids on food, and it works. Prior to the blood ceremony, my current boyfriend claimed to love me, but I caught him flirting with a girl. So I fed him body fluids and shaving clippings for a month. He’s solely mine now. He just pays attention to me, worships the land I walk on, wants to be with me at all hours of the day and night, and gives me everything I ask for. He adores the food I prepare. He is completely unconcerned. He is a devout Christian.” – (My Secret Hoodoo Blog)
For many of us hear the term aphrodisiac, we don’t think of menstrual blood in food. In reality, I’m confident that the majority of people despise this aphrodisiac. However, we live and travel in a world where many customs and norms work outside of our comfort zone and question our sense of right and wrong; feeding your man menstrual blood can just be another WTF.
Hoodoo is a form of traditional African-American southern folk magic that evolved from a variety of spiritual beliefs and practices brought over by slaves from West and Central Africa. Over time, as in many slave customs, the original values tend to change and borrow from the environment in which they were used. Hoodoo draws inspiration from “Jewish Psalms, German (Pennsylvania “Dutch”) Braucherei curios, and even parts of Espiritismo and Santeria.” [reference]

My boyfriend drinks my period blood

Menstruation and Culture is about the societal dynamics of how cultures interpret menstruation. Any social stigma about menstruation is known as a menstrual taboo. Menstruation is seen as unclean or humiliating in certain cultures, preventing even the discussion of menstruation in public (in the media and advertising) or in private (among friends, in the household, or with men). While anthropologists point out that the definitions of’sacred’ and ‘unclean’ may be intimately linked, many traditional religions consider menstruation ritually unclean. [two]
Menstruation is viewed differently in different cultures. The idea that menstruation should be kept secret underpins many conduct norms and correspondence regarding menstruation in Western industrial societies. [three] Menstrual observances, on the other hand, are treated positively in certain hunter-gatherer cultures, with no connotation of uncleanness. [number four]
The term “menstruation” is linked to the word “moon” etymologically. The phrases “menstruation” and “menses” come from the Latin mensis (month), which is related to the Greek mene (moon) and the English words month and moon. (5)