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What happens on wednesdays

What happens on wednesdays

What happens if you enter pierre’s store on a wednesday

“On Wednesdays, I wake up when it is still dark outside.” A preschooler’s inventive account of her day, from dark to dark, is a catalogue of the sweetly ordinary sights and experiences that make up the length and breadth of her reassuringly safe world. Every line of this story is informed by Jenkins’s deep understanding of what a small child considers essential, from her protagonist’s declaration of independence that “today is not a kissing day” to her very personal map of her neighborhood. This leads her “up the block where we once saw an umbrella stuck in a tree, past the bakery where we got the chocolate croissant, across the street, past the daycare where I used to go when I was young… With thick smudgy lines and a wintertime palette that embraces the leafless beauty and vitality of this intimate patch of Brooklyn, newcomer Castillo’s drawings evoke Margot Zemach. Every moment is both as specific as this one unnamed child and as common as every child, from what is the same every Wednesday (the nursery routine) to what is different (late afternoon play). Another victory at home. (Figures 3-6 in picture book)

I wonder what happens on wednesdays – pog

On Wednesdays, what Happens

Emily Jenkins wrote the piece.

Wax on wednesdays what happens in those third and final

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Wednesday (a children’s book) read aloud!

What happens after lunch, after sleep, after swimming, after the library – and after Daddy comes home – is how a preschooler measures the success of her day. She, too, does not use street signs to navigate her neighborhood. Her morning walk to see the dogs in the park takes her past the cat outside the deli, past the house of her friend Errolyn and the daycare where she used to go when she was younger, and down the street to the bagel shop.
The sounds, tastes, smells, and sights of a multiethnic Brooklyn neighborhood, as seen through the eyes of a child and captured in enchanting illustrations by debut illustrator Lauren Castillo, will inspire children to create their own sensory maps and schedules.

Lauren Castillo’s drawings are included in this picture book. July 2007, FSG/Frances Foster What happens after lunch, after sleep, after swimming, after the library – and after Daddy comes home – is how a preschooler measures the success of her day. She, too, does not use street signs to navigate her neighborhood. Her morning walk to see the dogs in the park takes her past the cat outside the deli, past Errolyn’s building and the daycare where she used to go as a kid, and down the street to the bagel shop. Children would be inspired to create their own sensory maps and schedules after experiencing the sounds, tastes, smells, and sights of a multiethnic Brooklyn neighborhood through the eyes of a child. Visit www.laurencastillo.com to see more of her work. People’s Opinions on What Happens on Wednesdays

A day in the life of a city kid, full of a young girl’s love of routine and the predictable pleasures of spending time with her parents. The tone of the voice is perfect: “We wake Daddy up when the clock strikes six o’clock. This can take quite some time.” The specifics of the journey from dawn to dusk, to school and playground, and back, become a valentine to ordinary days, which, as this book demonstrates, are truly extraordinary.” —From the New York Times

What happens on wednesday january 6

What happens after lunch, after sleep, after swimming, after the library – and after Daddy comes home – is how a preschooler measures the success of her day. She, too, does not use street signs to navigate her neighborhood. Her morning walk to see the dogs in the park takes her past the cat outside the deli, past the house of her friend Errolyn and the daycare where she used to go when she was younger, and down the street to the bagel shop. The sounds, tastes, smells, and sights of a multiethnic Brooklyn neighborhood, as seen through the eyes of a child and captured in enchanting illustrations by debut illustrator Lauren Castillo, will inspire children to create their own sensory maps and schedules.
EMILY JENKINS is the author of several acclaimed picture books, including Five Creatures and The New Animal, both Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Books. She is a resident of Brooklyn, New York. LAUREN CASTILLO is a Brooklyn-based artist who earned her master’s degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York City.