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What does it mean to smoke someone out

What does it mean to smoke someone out

Parents explain why they smoke weed | parents explain

I heard a line from an X album that said, “Purrp in that blunt, smoking suicide, bloody blunts.” T, here’s an explanation: X is literally smoking Purp in his blunt, and in this song, he’s smoking SpaceGhostPurp, a clever play on words. What does it mean to smoke someone? A purp is a form of marijuana, but what does it mean to smoke someone?
If the song isn’t about actually killing SpaceGhostPurp, then the term is most definitely being used figuratively to mean that the lyrical material directly disparages SpaceGhostPurp, maybe in the sense of a rap battle or “beef.”

Getting smoked

A girl is referred to as a Shawty in African-American slang. Smoking someone out could mean trying to figure out something, depending on the situation. The literal sense would be equivalent to lighting a fire in a position where someone is locked inside to compel them to leave due to the smoke.
A girl is referred to as a Shawty in African-American slang. Smoking someone out could mean trying to figure out something, depending on the situation. The literal sense would be equivalent to lighting a fire in a position where someone is locked inside to compel them to leave due to the smoke.
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The main word is’smoke,’ which has a long history of being associated with deceit in English and American slang. Stage magicians use a lot of smoke and mirrors, and blowing smoke, or blowing smoke in someone’s face, can mean lying or bragging at different times and locations. Smoking anyone can also mean mocking them or revealing a lie.
Many readers of BBC History Magazine would be familiar with Patrick O’Brian’s novels, and will be aware that his Napoleonic-era naval captain Jack Aubrey often uses the word “smoke” to describe uncovering a lie, as in “smoke out.”
However, we can’t find any reference to smoke and posteriors in any of the slang dictionaries we’ve looked at prior to WWII, when the tobacco bellows must have long been forgotten. The second half of the word was most likely added to ‘blow smoke’ to coarsen it, and it may have come from the British or, more likely, American military.
Despite how appealing the idea is, the dummies never had rears to blast through because a full figure wasn’t needed. The dummy was normally just a head with a tin helmet that was propped up on a stick.

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The term “we want all the smoke” first appeared in hip-hop artist 21 Savage’s album “All the Smoke” from June 2017. The phrase’s smoke applies to gun smoke. The term is used by 21 Savage to describe shooting people with an AK-47 rifle:
Future and Young Thug released their song “All Da Smoke” in October 2017, which once again mentions gun violence. Pro athletes started using we want all the smoke to mock and challenge their rivals after the release of these songs.
You bitch-ass ni**a, we don’t have to do some hoe shit to sell albums. Ni**a, get out of here. Say the ni**a Tory Lanez to come after us, ni**a. We’d like all of the smoke and fades. Ni**a, you can call whoever you want. You bitch-ass ni**a, we’re in California on a daily basis.”