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Triglycerides polar or nonpolar

Triglycerides polar or nonpolar

Macromolecules review

Polarity refers to the fact that water molecules have positive and negative ends, similar to small magnets. The majority of lipids are non-polar or just slightly polar, with just a few charged regions. Water adheres to the charged groups of hydrophilic (water-loving) compounds, allowing them to mix. Water molecules can’t stick to lipids because they lack charged groups, so they don’t mix with them. (Imagine using a magnet to pick up a glass marble.)
Chromatography can be used to isolate chemical mixtures and learn more about their properties. The bottom of a chromatography strip is blotted with drops of unknowns. The strip’s foundation is soaked in a solvent, which soaks its way up the strip like water does up a sponge. Some of the unknowns are also carried away by the solvent. Chemicals that have a similar polarity to the solvent can dissolve in it and pass along the solvent front. Tiny molecules travel quicker than big molecules. By observing how far different chemicals travel along the strip, you can decide how polar they are, as well as their size.

Fsc (part 1) chapter 2 lecture 8 ( classification of lipids -2

Butter, beeswax, and testosterone all have something in common. All of them are lipids, a class of compound formed by plants and animals that includes fats, oils, waxes, and steroid hormones. Lipids have a range of functions and uses in living cells and animals, ranging from energy storage to metabolism regulation, hormone signaling, and cell membrane structure. They help sea otters repel water and give several plant leaves a waxy sheen. Lipids give ice cream its delicious richness, give carrots their color, lubricate our car engines, and aid in the cleaning of our clothing.
What exactly is a lipid? You’ve already noticed one of the distinguishing characteristics of lipids: they don’t blend well with water if you’ve ever made salad dressing, seen a photograph of an oil tanker spill, or attempted to clean a greasy stain with water. Lipids are largely made up of carbon and hydrogen atoms, and the bonds between these many carbons and hydrogens are what give them their hydrophobic (“water-fearing”) properties. The bonding between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms in a water molecule results in a polar covalent bond (see our module Water: Properties and Behavior). Since oxygen atoms have a stronger pull on electrons than hydrogen atoms, the electrons that form this bond are shared unequally between the atoms. As seen in Figure 1, this results in a slight negative charge at the oxygen end of the water molecule and a slight positive charge at the hydrogen end.

Major elements in biological molecules: lipids

Lipids, unlike other biomolecule groups, are not characterized by unique structural characteristics. Lipids are water-insoluble biomolecules that lack the polarity needed for solubility in water-based solutions. Fats are also confused with lipids in popular culture, giving lipids a bad rep in terms of diet and health. Lipids, on the other hand, are important for a variety of cellular functions, including energy storage, structural support, defense, and communication. Waxes, steroids, fats, and phospholipids are examples of different lipid groups.
A fatty acid is a type of lipid monomer that contains one carboxyl group at the end of a linear hydrocarbon with at least four carbon atoms. Despite having one polar functional group, fatty acids with long hydrocarbon chains are often hydrophobic (insoluble in water) since hydrocarbon chains are nonpolar. Fatty acid monomers are not directly bound to each other in polymer chains, unlike other biomolecule types. In lipids, dehydration synthesis reactions form an ester linkage between a fatty acid’s carboxyl group and the hydroxyl group of an alcohol monomer like glycerol. The composition of monomers and polymers varies greatly depending on the form of lipid, and not all lipid groups have fatty acids.

Lipids | fats, steroids, and phospholipids | biological

Polarity refers to the fact that water molecules have positive and negative ends, similar to small magnets. The majority of lipids are non-polar or just slightly polar, with just a few charged regions. Water adheres to the charged groups of hydrophilic (water-loving) compounds, allowing them to mix. Water molecules can’t stick to lipids because they lack charged groups, so they don’t mix with them. (Imagine using a magnet to pick up a glass marble.)
Chromatography can be used to isolate chemical mixtures and learn more about their properties. The bottom of a chromatography strip is blotted with drops of unknowns. The strip’s foundation is soaked in a solvent, which soaks its way up the strip like water does up a sponge. Some of the unknowns are also carried away by the solvent. Chemicals that have a similar polarity to the solvent can dissolve in it and pass along the solvent front. Tiny molecules travel quicker than big molecules. By observing how far different chemicals travel along the strip, you can decide how polar they are, as well as their size.