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The sky is low by emily dickinson

The sky is low by emily dickinson

Emily dickinson’s “the sky is low”

A figure of speech in which a thing, an idea, or an animal is given human characteristics is known as personification. Non-human objects are depicted in such a way that we believe they are capable of acting like humans.
Personification can be found in almost every line of this poem. “The sky is low, the clouds are mean, and a traveling flake of snow debates whether it will go over a barn or into a rut.” Dickinson assigns feelings to the sky and clouds, implying that the snow is arguing. Dickinson gives the narrow wind the opportunity to complain and the gender of a boy in “A narrow wind complains all day How some one handled him; Nature, like us, is often caught Without her diadem.” She’s also implying that nature is a girl.
At first glance, this poem seems to take a sweet approach to describing a typical winter day. The real theme, in my opinion, is owned by the last two lines. ”Nature, like us, is occasionally caught off guard without her diadem.” It is said that people and nature are often caught with their diadems. People aren’t always going to be so sweet. They whine and behave obnoxious towards one another. They normally relinquish their humanity. As a result, it’s similar to nature. It conveys the message of being an optimist rather than complaining about life’s difficulties.

Poetry everywhere: “i started early” by emily dickinson

Quick and to-the-point, as well as clear and sweet.

The sky is low. a poem of emily dickinson

This one is right in front of me. When she talks about death, it’s as if she’s from another planet; but, whatever she sees in nature, I can see as well. One of my favorites. x edit – Perfection on Nov 20 2013 04:36 PM PST on the 14th of October, 2011 at 09:08 PM PST x edit Comments from the past sanmdr – the first stanza describes poor weather in which the sun cannot be seen and the clouds block the sunshine. The flake of snow will keep us guessing as to whether it will snow or not.
The second stanza describes a rumbling storm that raged all day…as if it was moaning about being mistreated. So she claims that on certain days, nature was caught without its crown… that is, without its majesticity. x update on Feb 17 2009 10:20 PM PST x edit on Feb 17 2009 10:20 PM PST x edit on Feb 17 2009 10:20 PM PST x sanmdr – First stanza- The sky is dark and the clouds are ominous ( thundering and dark perhaps- denotes a quarrel atmosphere). A flake of snow (rumours) flies through the barn (the house she lives in) and into a rut (public places), causing arguments that they are unsure will end.

24.9.20 rpm sue -poem the sky is low – emily dickinson

A figure of speech in which a thing, an idea, or an animal is given human characteristics is known as personification. Non-human objects are depicted in such a way that we believe they are capable of acting like humans.
Personification can be found in almost every line of this poem. “The sky is low, the clouds are mean, and a traveling flake of snow debates whether it will go over a barn or into a rut.” Dickinson assigns feelings to the sky and clouds, implying that the snow is arguing. Dickinson gives the narrow wind the opportunity to complain and the gender of a boy in “A narrow wind complains all day How some one handled him; Nature, like us, is often caught Without her diadem.” She’s also implying that nature is a girl.
At first glance, this poem seems to take a sweet approach to describing a typical winter day. The real theme, in my opinion, is owned by the last two lines. ”Nature, like us, is occasionally caught off guard without her diadem.” It is said that people and nature are often caught with their diadems. People aren’t always going to be so sweet. They whine and behave obnoxious towards one another. They normally relinquish their humanity. As a result, it’s similar to nature. It conveys the message of being an optimist rather than complaining about life’s difficulties.

“the sky is low, the clouds are mean,” by emily dickinson

One might yearn for the day when the sky meets the ground, allowing one to walk on clouds. But such a thing is oppressive for our speaker right now (“The Sky is low — the Clouds are mean”). A snowflake seems to be going faster (“traveling”) and making more decisions (“debates”) than she is.
It’s not like the snowflake going “across a Barn” or “through a Rut” is the best option. That may, however, be the range of options available to our speaker. Except that it’s snowing outside, so she may not have that option.
From “sky/clouds/flake of snow” to “wind” in the second stanza. Where you are – between a barn and a rut, in the sky, above the clouds – has no bearing on your decision. The flake will fall where it will, and the wind itself is grumbling. Like the wind, there are powers, stresses, and emotions, but they are not purposeful, despite their sensitivity.
Also the things that are pressuring us to make a choice – or even making choices for us – are insecure and indecisive. Dickinson’s speaker knows she’s talking about herself at this stage in the poem. If she was a snowflake caught in the wind, she is the wind as well.