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The art of napping

The art of napping

The art of napping

Until recently, researchers largely overlooked naps, instructing volunteers in sleep laboratories to stop napping during the day. It wasn’t until 1986 that the strongest proof that the body has an innate need to nap was released.
Dali, Salvador
One of the pivotal points in Salvador Dali’s growth as a great painter, he claimed, was what he called “slumber with a key.” This term refers to a quick nap in the afternoon that lasts no more than one second. Salvador Dali walked us through the five steps to the ultimate nap in his 1948 book Salvador Dali: 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship. Einstein, Albert To power his amazing brain, Einstein said he needed 10 hours of sleep at night and naps during the day. He, like Dali, practiced micro-napping, which meant he never allowed himself to fall asleep in the second level. To do this, he would sit in his favorite armchair, a pencil or spoon in his lap, and fall asleep. If the object fell, it would make a loud clang, startling him awake. Kennedy, John F. JFK and his wife Jackie took a one- to two-hour afternoon nap. JFK’s workdays were long (up to 12 hours) and he relied heavily on naps to stay awake. He learned the strategy from Dwight Eisenhower, who learned it from Winston Churchill. Other presidents, such as Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, were also big nappers. Nancy Reagan refuted all reports of Ronald Reagan’s daytime naps, fearing that her husband would be branded as a slacker.

The art of napping

Take a nap now. This isn’t a parent forcing a grumpy toddler to sleep. Your manager will remind you of this as soon as possible. Sleep deficiency costs American businesses more than $400 billion a year in lost efficiency and higher healthcare costs. Author Franklin Lee suggests an unlikely solution to workplace productivity crises and increasing health-care costs:
The Art of Napping is a fascinating book about sleep, the sleep business, and the forthcoming “sleep revolution.” If you’re interested in the benefits of sleep and napping for your health, appearance, productivity, creativity, and a variety of other factors, this book was a good introduction to the subject.

The art of napping

In a perfect world, you’d wake up feeling energized and refreshed, and stay that way until bedtime. However, we’re all aware of the peaks and troughs that can affect our energy levels during the day, and the urge to nap can be too great at times.
However, there is a lot of discussion about the humble sleep. Many sleep experts warn that napping as a habit will harm your overall sleep quality, although others argue that some napping strategies can be effective when used at the right time and for the right amount of time.
To clear the air and keep you updated, we’ll look at the advantages and disadvantages of napping to see if it’s something you can afford to do on occasion.
This is the big question, and the answer is always the same: not if you can avoid it. As previously reported, an ideal scenario would include getting the recommended seven to nine hours of quality sleep each night and having high to moderate energy levels during the day. Things get more difficult when the option is between napping and dealing with extreme sleep deprivation.

The art of napping | ep 4

Franklin Sooho Lee is the founder and CEO of Dragon’s LairTM, a New York City-based business that builds virtual reality bedrooms in major cities. Since he was a child, Lee has had a tumultuous relationship with sleep, often having difficulty falling asleep at night. He would come up with inventive ways to get a few extra minutes of sleep before going to school in the morning. Lee tried to convince his parents of the benefits of napping. Lee pursued research on the effect of sleep deprivation on metropolitan cities while studying Anthropology and East Asian Studies at Harvard College and later International Political Economy at Georgetown’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.