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Studies in short fiction

Studies in short fiction

Studies in short fiction publisher

This research examines both genre and theme in a wide variety of short fiction by Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Chopin’s short stories are compared to Wharton’s novellas, Chopin’s openly erotic prose, and Gilman’s homilies in which he warns of the dangers of sexually transmitted disease. There are also essays on Chopin’s race, Wharton’s New England novels, Gilman’s imaginative use of genre, and the film adaptation of ‘The Yellow Wallpaper.’ All three authors are also well-liked in American classrooms. A new Preface to the material is included in this paperback edition, providing a useful update on recent scholarship.
JANET BEER is the Dean of Humanities, Law, and Social Science at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. She has lectured and written widely on late nineteenth/early twentieth century American women’s literature, and she is currently co-authoring a book with Avril Horner on Edith Wharton’s fiction’s figure of the older woman (to be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2006). Special Relationships: Anglo-American Affinities and Antagonisms, 1854-1936 (co-edited with Bridget Bennett, 2002), American Feminism: Key Source Documents, 1848-1920 (editor, 2002), and Edith Wharton (editor, 2002) are among her other works (2001).

The machine stops

The journal’s goal is to present the most significant scholarship on short fiction published in the United States. From early anecdotes and sketches to the creation of more structured “stories” with plot, dialogue, and structure, to realistic masterpieces, to recent variants of the genre in flash fiction and micro tales, the journal covers it all. The journal welcomes all types of research essays, with a focus on new biographical, factual, or manuscript material that alters the traditional understanding of a story or how it is taught.
The Society for the Study of the American Short Story, which is affiliated with the American Literature Association, sponsors SASS. Scholars, students, and independent readers and writers are all welcome to join. Please go to http://americanshortstory.org/ to learn more about the culture. Editor’s Note
Essays should be written in Word and referenced using the new Chicago Manual of Style parenthetical text citations and a Works Cited section at the conclusion. Endnotes may be kept separate. Formal papers should be 18-25 pages long, including documentation, and notes should be 8-12 pages long. Interviews, manuscripts, images, and letters, among other types of content, are also welcomed.

Newberry college

Cheever is a predictable positive writer limited to tales of modern suburbia, according to critics, but O’Hara refutes this view. He begins with an examination of works published prior to 1945, then moves on to an examination of Cheever’s themes, styles, and narrative devices from 1945 to 1981, as well as a collection of critical essays by Alfred Kazin, George Hunt, and others.
Cheever is a predictable positive writer limited to tales of modern suburbia, according to critics, but O’Hara refutes this view. He begins with an examination of works published prior to 1945, then moves on to an examination of Cheever’s themes, styles, and narrative devices from 1945 to 1981, as well as a collection of critical essays by Alfred Kazin, George Hunt, and others.

Society for the study of the american short story

The intertwined fates of the modern short story and periodical culture in the period 1880–1950, the heyday of magazine short fiction in Britain, are highlighted in this series of original essays. The appearance, status, and functioning of short stories in a variety of periodical publications – highbrow and popular, mainstream and specialized, middlebrow and avant-garde – are investigated through case studies that concentrate on specific magazines, short stories, and writers. It highlights the ways in which magazines and periodicals influenced discussions about the short story form and encouraged or provoked writers to grow the genre by examining the effect of social and publishing networks on the development, distribution, and reception of short stories.
Short Fiction in Theory and Practice  10.2 special issue on Short Fiction as Humble Fiction, guest-edited by Christine Reynier, following the ENSFR conference at Montpellier in October 2019  is now available from Intellect Press. There’s also an interview with Sarah Hall, book reviews by Corinne Bigot, and a discussion with film director Eric Steel about his adaptation of David Bezmozgis’ ‘Minyan.’