s

Students have dismaying inability

Students have dismaying inability

Who owns study finds

You seem to be using Internet Explorer 11 or earlier. Modern browsers, such as the new versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge, are recommended for use with this website. You could get unexpected results if you keep using this browser.
“Circulating Ideas promotes dialogue about the creative people and ideas that allow libraries to flourish in the twenty-first century. With the support of the University of South Carolina School of Library and Information Science and listeners like you, this podcast is possible.”

Stanford study on information literacy

If the children are the future, it is possible that the future will be very uninformed. That’s one of the conclusions of a recent Stanford study that looked at students’ ability to analyze information sources and called the findings “dismaying,” “bleak,” and “a challenge to democracy.”
1. Go to the “Mutant Daises” link above this one. According to the post, the photo depicts a group of daisies that have mutated as a result of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Discuss the risks of nuclear power plants as a class. (Be on the lookout for a surprising addendum.)
4. Choose one or more of the following questions to answer: Do you believe you’ve been deceived by fake news? Are you able to remember a particular instance and/or location? What factors do you weigh when determining whether or not a news report is true? Why is it so important for our country’s future to be able to distinguish between fact and opinion pieces, true and false news, and misleading or skewed polls?

Evaluating information: the cornerstone of civic online reasoning

You seem to be using Internet Explorer 11 or earlier. Modern browsers, such as the new versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge, are recommended for use with this website. You could get unexpected results if you keep using this browser.
It’s just about the media. (15 December 2016). A glossary of fake news terms to help you understand the world of fake news. https://www.mediamatters.org/research/2016/12/15/understanding-the-fake-news-universe/214819/ .
T. Wen (2017, June 30).
The telltale signs of a fake image. [From a newspaper article] https://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170629-the-hidden-signs-that-can-detect-if-a-photo-is-fake/
C. Domonoske, C. Domonoske, C. Domonoske (2016, November 23).
According to a survey, students have a “dismaying” inability to distinguish between false and real news. https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/23/503129818/study-finds-students-have-dismaying-inability-to-tell-fake-news-from-real/study-finds-students-have-dismaying-inability-to-tell-fake-news-from-real/
N. Renner (2015, February 10).
How news websites spread (and debunk) online theories, unverified claims, and misinformation: Lies, damn lies, and viral material
The Tow Center for Digital Journalism is a non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of digital journalism Columbia University’s School of Journalism https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/doi/10.7916/D8Q81RHH retrieved from https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/doi/10.7916/D8Q81RHH

How does fake news affect students

Our collection of thought-provoking and informative posts on educating and raising children includes: students not understanding the difference between false and real news, why we should keep tests, and Independent schools being recognized as innovators.
Fake news has been making headlines recently, with a debate about its impact – this article refers to it as a “fake news crisis.” So, how do young digital natives know who to believe? According to a recent Stanford survey of 7800 students, the response is a disappointing “no.” They were astounded by what they found, calling the findings “dismaying,” “bleak,” and a “danger to democracy.”
There is growing concern about a lack of interest in mathematics, particularly given the focus on STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Kevin Larkin of Griffiths University responds to children’s concerns about the value of math and whether it will benefit them later in life. If you haven’t already, check out our recent post on the topic, Solving The Problem: Making Maths Cool.