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Sociology chapter 3 test answers

Sociology chapter 3 test answers

Chapter 3 ecology test answ…

Graffiti’s colorful sketches, words, and symbols are a lively expression of culture—or, depending on one’s point of view, a troubling expression of the creator’s disregard for a community’s shared room. (Flickr photo courtesy of aikijuanma)
Is there a set of guidelines for eating at McDonald’s? In general, we don’t think about rules in fast food restaurants, but if you look around one on a normal weekday, you’ll notice people behaving as if they’ve been conditioned to be fast food customers. They queue, choose items from the colorful menus, pay with debit cards, and wait for food trays to arrive. Customers wad up their paper wrappers and toss them into garbage cans after a short meal. Even though no rules are posted and no officials guide the operation, customers pass through it in an orderly and predictable manner.
Consider what would happen if you followed different rules. (You’d be engaging in ethnomethodology, which involves intentionally disrupting social norms in order to learn about them.) For example, make reservations ahead of time and ask the cashier specific questions about the food’s ingredients and preparation. Request that your meal be delivered to your table. Alternatively, when you go, throw your garbage on the deck. You’ll almost certainly provoke offensive responses from restaurant workers and other patrons.

Chapter 3 review questions sociology

Despite the fact that the terms “society” and “culture” are often used interchangeably, they have distinct meanings. A society is a group of people who share a common culture and community. Culture is a broad term that encompasses both material and nonmaterial aspects of people’s shared attitudes and beliefs. Our ethnocentrism and xenocentrism color our perceptions of cultural differences. Sociologists attempt to apply cultural relativism in their work.
A culture is made up of many components, such as a society’s ideals and beliefs. Norms, such as statutes, mores, and folkways, control culture as well. A society’s symbols and vocabulary are crucial in the development and transmission of culture.
Sociologists distinguish between high and mainstream culture in cultures. Subcultures—smaller communities that share a common identity—abound in societies. Countercultures oppose mainstream ideals and create their own set of cultural rules and expectations. Cultures change through the invention or exploration of new concepts and ways of thought. Technology is the foundation of innovation in many modern societies, and its rapid growth can lead to cultural lag. Technology also contributes to globalization by facilitating the spread of both material and nonmaterial culture.

Lesson quiz 3 1 culture sociology answers

This archive, which is based at the University of Essex and is sponsored by the ESRC, gathers and disseminates qualitative data from a variety of research projects. You can use the ‘Qualicat’ catalogue to find data on a specific subject or datasets from some of the most well-known sociological studies. On a rainy and windy afternoon, it’s well worth exploring!
This archive, which is also located at the University of Essex, includes a broader range of quantitative data from social science studies. Registered users can request a copy of the original data sets by browsing the catalogue for abstracts and methodological specifics of each analysis. Data from large national surveys, such as the British Crime Survey and the Social Attitudes Survey, are also available.
This is an online journal that focuses on analysis methods. Articles on any type of research design and methodology can be found in the catalog and read on the web pages. The journal is published four times a year and is a good way to stay up to date on current social science patterns.

Sociology chapter 3 culture test answers

Graffiti’s colorful sketches, words, and symbols are a lively expression of culture—or, depending on one’s point of view, a troubling expression of the creator’s disregard for a community’s shared room. (Photo courtesy of Flickr user aikijuanma)
Is there a set of guidelines for eating at McDonald’s? In most fast food restaurants, we don’t think about rules because they’re built to be casual, cheap, and convenient. On a normal weekday, however, you’ll see people behaving as though they’ve been prepared for the role of fast food customer. They queue, choose their things from overhead menus before placing their orders, pay with debit cards, and take trays of food to one side. Customers wad up their paper wrappers and toss them into garbage cans after a short meal. In the words of Max Weber, this is a highly rationalized food scheme. Even though no rules are posted and no officials guide the operation, customers pass through it in an orderly and predictable manner.