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Sampling design and analysis

Sampling design and analysis

Analysis of survey data

Download the bibliography Thank You Notes The study that this paper is based on was conducted by the University of Melbourne as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. We are thankful for the support given by the Australian Government Department of Health, as well as the survey data provided by the boys and men.
Researchers can access Ten to Men response data through a request and review process. http://www.tentomen.org.au/index.php/researchers.html contains information on how to access Ten to Men data. There are also copies of Wave 1 questionnaires, Wave 1 data books, and the Ten to Men Data User’s Manual on that website.
MS, JC, LG, and IG were in charge of the study and/or the analytical design. MS and LG analyzed the data and wrote the manuscript. All authors have completed a critical review of the manuscript and have given their approval to submit this version.
The University of Melbourne Human Research Ethics Committee accepted the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (HREC 1237897 & 1237376). Participants gave their informed consent to take part in the study.

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SAMPLING: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS, 2ND EDITION, by Sharon L. Lohr, offers a contemporary introduction to the field of survey sampling for a broad audience of statistics students. A number of influential surveying organizations have classified the book as a standard guide for training on real-world survey problems because it is practical and authoritative. Lohr focuses on the statistics.
SAMPLING: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS, 2ND EDITION, by Sharon L. Lohr, offers a contemporary introduction to the field of survey sampling for a broad audience of statistics students. A number of influential surveying organizations have classified the book as a standard guide for training on real-world survey problems because it is practical and authoritative. Lohr focuses on the mathematical aspects of sample collection and analysis, integrating a wide range of applications from various disciplines. The text explains how to determine whether a sample is accurate and how to design and interpret a variety of sample surveys. There are optional technology manuals for using statistical tools with survey results, as well as recent studies on theoretical and applied aspects of sampling.

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SAMPLING: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS, 2ND EDITION, by Sharon L. Lohr, offers a contemporary introduction to the field of survey sampling for a broad audience of statistics students. A number of influential surveying organizations have classified the book as a standard guide for training on real-world survey problems because it is practical and authoritative. Lohr focuses on the mathematical aspects of sample collection and analysis, integrating a wide range of applications from various disciplines. The text provides guidance on how to say whether a sample is legitimate or not, and how to design and evaluate several different types of sample surveys

Sample survey methods…

A widely used design in genetic epidemiologic research is the so-called case-control/family sampling design. Here, cases and controls are sampled and response variables, either quantitative or qualitative, for relatives of cases are contrasted with those of control relatives. This design can be used to investigate hereditary aggregation, help identify genetic subtypes, and test the discrete versus continuous spectrum hypothesis for disorders with unknown causes. However, the statistical independence principle required by traditional case-control studies is violated for findings from related individuals who share the same genetic/environmental conditions. As a result, failing to account for interdependence among related subjects would result in inaccurate sample size estimates and potentially erratic scientific conclusions. We discuss several statistical issues related to the case-control/family sampling design in this paper, with a focus on its use in psychiatric research. We specifically address 1) the relative merits of matched versus unmatched designs, 2) statistical methods for evaluating family data, and 3) sample size formulas for quantitative and qualitative trait studies. For illustration, a hereditary epidemiologic analysis of schizophrenia is used.