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Pbs civil war the untold story

Pbs civil war the untold story

Pbs civil war the untold story

Civil war the untold story s01e04 death knell of the

Elizabeth McGovern recounts how the North-South war, long characterized by battles like Gettysburg, Antietam, and Bull Run, was heavily influenced by developments in what was then known as the West in this enlightening documentary.
Making a documentary about the Civil War after Ken Burns’ excellent 9-part series in 1990 takes a lot of guts. Chris Wheeler, on the other hand, has done just that. He’s made a documentary that’s equally convincing, if not more historically accurate. That’s not to say Burns’ work isn’t good, but getting Burns in place allowed Wheeler to go places Burns couldn’t, and that was to everyone’s advantage. Wheeler outperforms Burns in his discussion of the history to the war and his emphasis on the western front. Burns downplays all of these crucial aspects. H often uses enactments in a docudrama style, which I believe helps to tell the tale. Of course, nothing compares to the documentary’s quality standards, which include the photography and narration. Wheeler is never around. Wheeler still lacks the multitude of Civil War experts gathered by Burns, as well as the depth and reach of Burns’ sources. But what Wheeler excels at is explaining why battles were so important and why their results were often predetermined. There is no need to choose between Burns and Wheeler. Both are great sources for information on the Civil War, and when read together, they provide a more complete image of this massive case.

[email protected] | Joanne Ostrow | UPDATED: September 1, 2016 at 9:51 a.m. | PUBLISHED: April 3, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. With a prominent narrator, prime spots on the national PBS slate, and a bit of fringe uproar, a locally generated reflection on what we don’t know about the Civil War is primed for effect.
The documentary “Civil War: The Untold Tale,” produced by Denver-based Great Divide Pictures, pushes the boundaries of how and why the bloody story unfolded. Not least, the film emphasizes that the conflict’s political implications and deep tensions continue to this day.
“Civil War: The Untold Story” will air on both public television stations in the region. Beginning April 10 at 9 p.m., Rocky Mountain PBS (KRMA) will broadcast the five-hour documentary in prime time. CPT12 (KBDI) will broadcast two episodes on April 29 at 8 p.m., followed by the final three on April 30 at 7 p.m.
The indignation is due to skeptics who disagree with the documentary’s central premise: that the Civil War was fought over slavery. (Some radical groups say it was for “states’ rights,” which makes the whole secession concept seem more appealing.)

The Civil War is a 1990 American television documentary miniseries about the American Civil War directed by Ken Burns. From September 23 to 27, 1990, it was the first broadcast to air on PBS for five nights in a row.
More than 39 million people watched at least one episode, with an average of more than 14 million people tuning in each evening, making it PBS’ most-watched program ever. It received over 40 major television and film awards. Shortly after the series aired, a companion book to the documentary was published. 1st
Its filmography was revolutionary at the time, and it gave birth to techniques like the Ken Burns effect. “Ashokan Farewell,” the show’s theme song, has received a lot of praise. For many Americans, the series was highly popular, and it is their primary source of information about the Civil War. However, it has been chastised for its historical accuracy, especially for failing to mention slavery as a cause of the war.
The series was rebroadcast in June 1994[2] as a lead-up to Baseball, and then remastered in 2002 for its 12th anniversary, though it was still in standard definition resolution. In 2015, the film underwent a full digital restoration to high-definition format to celebrate its 25th anniversary and the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination.

PBS stations around the country will begin screening Civil War: The Untold Story, a five-part series on the war in the western theater, according to Pat Young of Civil War Talk. After the jump, you’ll find a partial list of stations where it’ll be broadcast. Chris Wheeler, the series’ director, was interviewed by HistoryNet last year:
Chris Wheeler (CBS News): It’s on a number of levels. Instead of concentrating on the Virginia-Maryland-Pennsylvania campaign, we’re telling the Civil War tale through the eyes of the Western Theater, which includes Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Vicksburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and the Atlanta Campaign, which took place between the Appalachians and the Mississippi River. Although it is not entirely unknown, the story of that period of the war is seldom told. Many scholars say the war was won or lost in the Western Campaign. We’re not going to neglect what’s going on in the East; we’ll mention it briefly and place it in context with what’s going on in the West.
HN: Thank you for your time. The presumption is that the seat of war was in the Virginia-Maryland-Pennsylvania area, and that everything else in the Western Theater was just a sideshow. Why do you believe the Western Theater receives less respect?