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Nisa the life and words of a kung woman

Nisa the life and words of a kung woman

Quran: 2. surah al-baqara (the calf): complete arabic and

Harvard University Press has reprinted this classic paperback, and it is available only from them. This book chronicles Nisa’s life as a member of the! Kung tribe of hunter-gatherers from the Kalahari desert in southern Africa. Told to Marjorie Shostak, a Harvard anthropologist who succeeded in breaking the code with Nisa’s help, in her own words—earthy, sensitive, vibrant—
Harvard University Press has reprinted this classic paperback, and it is available only from them. This book chronicles Nisa’s life as a member of the! Kung tribe of hunter-gatherers from the Kalahari desert in southern Africa. The tale is a fascinating view of a remarkable woman, told in her own words—earthy, sensitive, vivid—to Marjorie Shostak, a Harvard anthropologist who succeeded in breaking down enormous barriers of language and culture with Nisa’s collaboration.
From the viewpoint of a female hunter/gatherer in the Kalahari bush, this is a fantastic tale. What a rare discovery! What a blessing it is to have this. Nisa’s tale was compiled in the conventional manner! Encroaching farmer-rancher styles and Europeans were beginning to shift Kung culture. This book follows the lives of the!Kung people, mainly women, from birth to death. What I like about this as a dry abstract is how they feel about their everyday lives and interactions with others and their surroundings.

Nguyen falls apart chapter 14

Harvard University Press has reprinted this classic paperback, and it is available only from them.

Quran: 41. surah fussilat (explained in detail): arabic and

The life of Nisa, a member of the!Kung tribe of hunter-gatherers from the Kalahari desert in southern Africa, is told in this novel. The story is a fascinating view of a remarkable woman, told in her own words to Marjorie Shostak, a Harvard anthropologist who succeeded in breaking down enormous barriers of language and culture with Nisa’s collaboration.
[A] meticulous, sad, and thrilling novel.
—From the New York Times
Nisa and Shostak are both unusual individuals, and their partnership has resulted in an unrivaled personal account of!Kung life, rather than a social or ecological one. More importantly, their work reveals the universality of women’s perceptions and emotions, amid significant cultural and societal disparities. Nisa teaches us what it means to be a!Kung, a woman, and, ultimately, a person. —Place For an engrossing account, we may thank a remarkable anthropologist. The New York Review of Books (N.Y.R.B.) I experience Nisa’s originality, poignancy, and enthusiasm anew every time I reread it, as I have done in teaching over the years. Few books have held up as well as this one in terms of influencing the look and sound of ethnography for entire generations of anthropologists. It’s a timeless classic of currency and endless potential. —George Marcus, Rice University Anthropology Professor Nisa is a book that is both humbling and inspiring. —”Wall Street Journal” (09/08/2012) —”Wall Street Journal” (09/08/2012) —”Wall Street Journal” (09/08/2012) —

Quran: 24. surah an-nur (the light): arabic and english

Harvard University Press has reprinted this classic paperback, and it is available only from them.

N!ai the story of a kung woman – preview

The life of Nisa, a member of the!Kung tribe of hunter-gatherers from the Kalahari desert in southern Africa, is told in this novel. The story is a fascinating view of a remarkable woman, told in her own words to Marjorie Shostak, a Harvard anthropologist who succeeded in breaking down enormous barriers of language and culture with Nisa’s collaboration.
Shostak offers solid context on the!Kung community, which is particularly useful for those who are unfamiliar with the people. The real gem in this work, however, is Nisa’s thoughts and vocabulary. Nisa paints a picture of her life and her people with clarity and unpretentious authenticity. The reader is drawn to challenge their own prejudices and judgments not only because they think about their ways and worldview, but also because they are drawn to question their own biases and judgments. A must-read for those interested in learning more about the human condition.

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Marjorie Shostak (May 11, 1945 – October 6, 1996) was an anthropologist from the United States. Despite the fact that she never earned a formal anthropology degree, she did extensive fieldwork among the!Kung San people of the Kalahari desert in south-western Africa and was well-known for her depictions of women’s lives in this hunter-gatherer culture.
Shostak was born and raised in the borough of Brooklyn, New York. She earned her B.A. in literature from Brooklyn College, where she met her future husband, Melvin Konner, and was a supporter of the women’s equal rights movement. [requires citation]
Shostak and Konner lived among the!Kung San in the Dobe region of southwest Africa, near the Botswana-South Africa border, in 1969–71. They studied the!Kung language and did anthropological fieldwork there. Shostak investigated the role of women in!Kung San society, becoming close with one woman in particular, known by the nickname “Nisa,” while her husband focused on medical issues such as diet and fertility. Nisa: The Life and Words of a!Kung Woman, written by Shostak, was first published by Harvard University Press in 1981 and has since become a standard work in anthropology. It alternates between anthropological observation and the life story of a “primitive” woman told in her own words, weaving together the distinct voices of Shostak and Nisa. Shostak claims in the book that because of their food contributions,!Kung San women had higher status and autonomy than women in Western cultures. [requires citation]