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New orleans city data

New orleans city data

New orleans update on coronavirus restrictions 12.16.20

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hmm… I don’t know, Central City is a pretty nasty place. Especially in the Magnolia and St. Andrews areas. NO East is also a nasty place. This year, it seems that people are being carjacked and shot, or their homes are being invaded on a regular basis. I’ve driven down a few streets in the 7th ward and felt compelled to get out of there as soon as possible.
I’ve driven through some poor northern city ghettos (Cleveland, NYC, Philly, DC), and Cleveland is the only one that gives me the same anxiety just going through that NOLA does (circa 2007ish).
If you’re looking to live on the street or on the edge of it, I wouldn’t suggest NOLA. The odds aren’t in your favor. If you want to do that in the south, avoid Louisiana because it is the most violent state in the nation.

City data shows decline in testing

On Thursday, Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed an executive order detailing the plan’s core principles and instructing his chief administrative office to release a memo outlining the city’s open data policy in greater detail in the coming weeks.
In a statement, Landrieu said, “When I took office in 2010, I committed to making city government more effective, responsive, and transparent so that our citizens could hold us accountable.” “This executive order is the next step in fulfilling our commitment to our people and shaping the future of New Orleans for future generations.”
Landrieu hopes that the policy would prompt the development of “a mechanism for proactively publishing publishable city data,” which will include the appointment of “data coordinators” in each department to “prioritize data for publication.”
In addition, the new strategy would include “a roadmap for developing a robust data inventory,” as well as “a repository where existing datasets can be made freely accessible to the public on an open license basis” and “a repository where authoritative geographic data will be preserved.”

City data shows the five blocks in phoenix with the most crime

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It’s a matter of a strong emotional connection for me. When I was younger, I lived in New Orleans for two to three years before returning a few years later for another few months. I stayed in apartments in the French Quarter both times. That was decades ago, and for a long time, I only came back for a visit once or twice every 25 years or so. I’ve been back for visits closer to once a year in recent years—maybe five times in the last seven years.
I spent comfortably 80% of my time in the Quarter when I lived there. I’ve made it a point to visit other parts of the city on recent visits, spending about a quarter of each visit in the Quarter. And I’ve really loved broadening my horizons.

Tedxnola – allison plyer – data democracy

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Rents in this slum are exorbitant.
Violent crime is at an all-time high.
There are now just the ultra-rich and ultra-poor who live there.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS THE MIDDLE CLASS ANYMORE.
If at all possible, stay away from this disgusting cesspool.
It’s possible that my advice will save your life.
I agree with that poster’s points about bad highways, schools, violence, and politicians…but wishing for a hurricane to re-devastate a city full of fellow human beings is beyond pathetic, and you, if you agree, are even more so. That’s what you get for telling the truth in a hurtful way.
People who come here from another city, I believe, would have more to compare the city to. I’ve lived in many countries, and although each has its own set of advantages, there is nowhere else I’d rather call home.
When I first moved to New Orleans, I chose to live in Uptown, near Tulane University and Audubon Park, because I felt safe there. Though I felt at ease, I was aware that I needed to be vigilant at all times, so when I learned that I would soon be a grandmother, I decided to leave the city and relocate just a few miles outside of it to an area (English Turn) that I had longed to call home because of its peace and tranquility. It’s just 8 miles from the Central Business District, and there’s no need to worry about crime because there isn’t any. When you consider how much less expensive homes are there than in Uptown or the Garden District, it’s hard to see why someone would want to move somewhere else. My husband and I enjoy our time here, and my daughter and her family enjoy spending time with us as well. Check out English Turn on the West Bank if you want to live in a quiet, tranquil environment. It’s an incredible place to call home.