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Narcolepsy and weight gain

Narcolepsy and weight gain

Narcolepsy q&a with dr. paul reading

People with narcolepsy are susceptible to gaining weight as well as becoming overly tired. In reality, narcoleptic patients often gain weight while eating much less than the average person.
Now, according to a study published in the October issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press journal, researchers have found out why. It appears that a lack of orexin, a neuropeptide hormone that promotes appetite and wakefulness, may result in a lack of energy-burning brown fat.
There are two kinds of fat: white and brown. Brown fat burns calories and produces heat in the process, while white fat stores them. It had been suggested that orexins could affect body temperature, but it wasn’t clear how.
Orexins are necessary for the formation of mature brown fat from its precursors, according to new evidence from mice. When animals have inadequate orexin, their brown fat activity decreases, as does their energy expenditure. Similarly, orexin-injected mice lose a large amount of weight.

Episode #28: what happens in our brain and body when we

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) with regular uncontrollable sleep attacks, cataplexy (a sudden loss of muscle tone frequently associated with the experience of intense emotions), and other sleep-related symptoms describe narcolepsy form 1. (1, 2). Additionally, narcolepsy has been linked to a higher BMI (3). Obesity affects more than half of all children with narcolepsy, according to a 2013 survey, and it’s linked to symptom severity (4). In a study of pediatric narcolepsy patients in Sweden, rapid weight gain and a significantly higher BMI were registered after the H1N1 vaccination (5, 6). High BMI in childhood is a proven risk factor for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in adulthood (7, 8), and studies have also shown that narcolepsy patients are at an elevated risk (9, 10). While an increase in BMI is well-documented at the onset of narcolepsy, the associated body fat distribution and mechanisms of weight gain in narcolepsy have yet to be extensively studied in humans. However, it’s been suggested that the loss of orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus may be a cause (11).

Diabetes conference integrates wellness for thriving

Being diagnosed with narcolepsy is the first step toward treatment. Narcolepsy symptoms typically improve rapidly with adequate diagnosis and treatment; however, if left untreated, narcolepsy can severely affect everyday life, resulting in problems at school and work, a deteriorated social life, and dangerous driving. A narcolepsy specialist will begin by inquiring about sleepiness, cataplexy, and other symptoms. The doctor can rule out possible causes of sleepiness, such as a lack of sleep, sedative drugs, or issues with sleep timing, such as staying up late. After that, the doctor will perform a physical and neurological test to check for symptoms of other conditions that may trigger sleepiness or muscle weakness. The majority of people with narcolepsy will pass their exams with flying colors. If a doctor suspects narcolepsy, sleep tests may be used to validate the diagnosis.

Dr. oz answers questions about if you are getting enough

People with narcolepsy are susceptible to gaining weight as well as becoming overly tired. In reality, narcoleptic patients often gain weight while eating much less than the average person.
Now, according to a study published in the October issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press journal, researchers have found out why. It appears that a lack of orexin, a neuropeptide hormone that promotes appetite and wakefulness, may result in a lack of energy-burning brown fat.
There are two kinds of fat: white and brown. Brown fat burns calories and produces heat in the process, while white fat stores them. It had been suggested that orexins could affect body temperature, but it wasn’t clear how.
Orexins are necessary for the formation of mature brown fat from its precursors, according to new evidence from mice. When animals have inadequate orexin, their brown fat activity decreases, as does their energy expenditure. Similarly, orexin-injected mice lose a large amount of weight.