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My gynecologist made me come

My gynecologist made me come

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As I scooted back on the pelvic exam table, the crinkly white paper bunching up under my bare buttocks, my gynecologist inquired. I was shivering at the sight of the frozen speculum she was wielding, and it wasn’t just because of this appointment. When I lived in Iowa, I had been seeing her for years for my annual pelvic examinations, STD checks, and birth control prescription, and we did this song and dance every time. She thought I was struggling with some sexual disorder or trauma because my aversion to the speculum was so intense. “Actually, sex isn’t painful for me,” I explained. “I’m sorry, but this is making me very nervous.” She asked me to step closer to her, spread my legs wider, and relax my pelvic muscles once more. She encouraged me, “The more comfortable you are, the simpler this will be.” It seemed improbable.
She slid the speculum into my cervix and cranked it open wider to inspect it. As I began to feel light-headed, I tightened my grip on the table, digging my fingers into the padding. I tried to focus on anything else—a mark on the foam-tiled ceiling, anything—but it was impossible. Nothing could prevent my thighs from bracing and my abs from clenching, no matter how hard I tried to take deep breaths. I could sense the blood rushing out of my head as she scraped around inside me with different swabs. Someone seemed to be gaining access to a part of me that should never be reached. She was only there for a few minutes, but it seemed like an eternity. “Everything right, all done,” I heard just when I felt I was going to pass out. My doctor slid the speculum out of me mercifully. She always had to use her gloved fingertips to feel my ovaries from the inside, but that part of the pelvic exam never troubled me. It wasn’t exactly cozy, but it was human and relaxed enough. It was the speculum that scared and hurt me the most. After the test, I shuffled into the bathroom in my paper gown to clean off the lube and put my clothes back on, and I knew I’d feel violated and uneasy for the next few days. The fact that I wouldn’t have to come back for another year was the only consolation I had.

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Hello there. My name is Noelle, and I’m 24 years old. I just had my first gynecologist visit. You might be surprised that it took me so long to go, but here’s the thing: I’ve never had any issues with my menstrual cycle, so I’ve never felt compelled to go. The fact that I didn’t have to worry about a stranger looking around my vaginal area was an added bonus. With that said, I’ve come to understand that there are other significant reasons to visit the gynecologist besides finding out why you’re not getting your period on a regular basis. It’s a preventative measure so that if you have any problems with your vaginal or reproductive system that don’t show up right away, such as cervical or breast cancer or an STD, your doctor will diagnose and treat them early.
Even though cervical cancer and breast cancer are uncommon in teenagers and young adults, frequent visits to the gynecologist are an effective preventative measure that can help you avoid developing these problems. If you do acquire them, the routine exams will help you diagnose them early enough to receive the best care possible. Even though I was fine (as expected), given the value of reproductive health, it was worth the slight embarrassment to ensure that all was in order down there. It’s only been a week since my test, so if I hear anything different from my doctor, I’ll let you know. The moral of the story is that going to the gynecologist is going to be uncomfortable, but it’ll only be awkward for about 30 minutes, which you’ll most definitely (hopefully) forget as soon as you step out the door. And if they find anything isn’t quite right, it means the trip was well worth it.

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You’re concerned about your appearance.

My gynecologist made me come online

Your ob-gyn only has about 7 to 11 minutes with you at each appointment, and she isn’t going to waste it worrying about how close your shave is. Maureen Mulvihill, MD, an ob-gyn in private practice in Southern California, says, “I see so many patients who apologize for not shaving their legs.” “However, I’m not conscious of it, and I’ve never met another physician who is.” Dr. Lebowitz is in agreement. “We don’t care about your stubble — we just want to make sure everything down there is in good working order!” she exclaims. “Hair is a normal thing, and we all have it.” (These 15 daily activities are wreaking havoc on your vaginal health in more ways than you realize!) You self-diagnose yeast infections and urinary tract infections, for example.

My gynecologist made me come of the moment

Going to the gynecologist for the first time or the tenth time can be nerve-wracking, but it doesn’t have to be. Here are the answers to 20 questions you may be too afraid to ask before your visit to help you conquer your fears.
This is a common worry. It can be disturbing to reveal yourself in front of others, including physicians. Know that gynecologists see thousands of bodies of all shapes and sizes on a regular basis, and today is just another day for them. As a result, they are aware that this isn’t the most pleasant aspect of your stay. You should always request to speak with the doctor first and then get undressed afterward. This can put you at ease, particularly if you’re meeting your doctor for the first time.
Don’t worry if you’re embarrassed about the bleeding. We deal with vaginal bleeding on a regular basis; however, menstrual blood can often affect the results of a pap smear. In an ideal world, you will not have a pap smear during your menstrual cycle, but this is normally not a problem. If you’re having issues, don’t put off seeing a doctor because you’re on your time.