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Muslim vs christian debate

Muslim vs christian debate

Debate – what did jesus preach christianity or islam? dr

A Christian and a Muslim discuss the differences between their respective faiths. This ground-breaking book is a reasoned discussion between two conservative, uncompromising theologians who justify and defend their convictions. White and Ally engage in an open and frank discussion about the fundamental issues that divide Christianity and Islam, focusing on such subjects as Jesus’ deity, the existence of God, and the existence of the Holy Spirit.
A Christian and a Muslim discuss the differences between their respective faiths. This ground-breaking book is a reasoned discussion between two conservative, uncompromising theologians who justify and defend their convictions. White and Ally engage in an open and frank discussion about the fundamental issues that divide Christianity and Islam, focusing on such subjects as Jesus’ god, the nature of the Trinity, and how believers can enter heaven. Unlike several books from both sides that try to downplay their respective groups’ views in the name of finding common ground, this book will appeal to the vast majority of believers in both communities. Both writers agree the other is wrong; not only wrong in the sense of “better luck next time,” but eternally wrong. They also agree that no amount of conversation can get us anywhere if we cannot accurately represent what our respective religions teach about the other.

An islam christian debate: part 1

Paul Meets Muhammad: A Christian-Muslim Debate on the Resurrection>Products>Paul Meets Muhammad: A Christian-Muslim Debate on the Resurrection

Big debate! imran hussein vs john richards | islam vs

A Christian-Muslim Debate on the Resurrection: Paul Meets Muhammad

Christian vs muslim debate: turn the camera off

Licona, Michael R.

Who is jesus, muslim vs christian debate – imam karim

Baker published the book in 2006.

Did jesus rise from the dead? christian vs muslim (william

9781441253965 is the ISBN number for this book.

An islam christian debate: part 2

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Debate: discrimiligion: christianity and islam

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Former muslim turned christian debating muslims – fikret

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the big picture
Imagine a noisy arena filled with Christians, Muslims, and curious onlookers all waiting to hear the result of one of history’s most important debates. Christianity is false if Jesus did not rise from the dead. Christianity, on the other hand, is real and Islam is false if Jesus is revived. The stakes are extremely high.
In Paul Meets Muhammad, two theological heavyweights debate the authenticity of their teachings, establishing claims and rebuttals while citing facts from the Qur’an and the Gospel accounts. This page-turner is both intriguing and exciting, and it provides a detailed defense of Jesus’ resurrection as well as Christianity itself.
In this day and age, as Muslims in the West are more conscious of Islam, it is important for Christians to know how to respond when they are asked about the faith that they have in us. Since the Qur’an rejects the historicity of Jesus’ crucifixion, death, and resurrection, the evidence for these events provides justification for believing that Christianity, not Islam, is the source of truth regarding Jesus and the God he revealed. Licona not only marshals the evidence in this book, but also refutes the usual objections raised by Muslim apologists.

Muslim vs christian debate 2021

The world’s two largest religions, Christianity and Islam, have a long and storied history together, despite some significant religious differences. Both religions claim to have originated in the Middle East and believe themselves monotheistic.
Christianity is an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion that emerged in the first century CE from Second Temple Judaism. It is based on Jesus Christ’s life, teachings, death, and resurrection, and those who adhere to it are known as Christians. [1] Islam is a monotheistic Abrahamic religion that originated in the 7th century CE. Islam, which literally means “submission to God,” was built on Muhammad’s teachings as an act of submission to God’s will. Muslims, which means “submitter to God,” are those who obey it. [two] [3] Muslims hold a variety of perspectives on Christianity, ranging from seeing Christians as People of the Book to seeing them as kafirs (infidels) who practice shirk (polytheism) because of Trinitarianism, and as dhimmis (religious taxpayers) under Sharia. Christian attitudes toward Islam vary, ranging from seeing Islam as a fellow Abrahamic faith worshiping the same God to seeing Islam as heresy or an apostatic cult that denies the Crucifixion and rejects Christ’s divinity.

Muslim vs christian debate of the moment

Sa’d ibn Mansur (Izz Al-dawla) Ibn Kammuna (d. 1284), a Baghdadi physician and philosopher, modeled a method of inter-religious scriptural inquiry that may have been even more radical than scriptural reasoning. However, he did so against the weight of both Muslim and Jewish classical teaching, as did only a few other like-minded souls of the time. This essay introduces ibn Kammuna’s efforts to turn diatribe into dialogue by explaining and discussing the core concepts of his dialogic approach after setting the background for his work in 12th to 14th century Muslim-Jewish diatribes.
When we think of the religious and philosophical debates that took place during the Islamic Middle Ages, a stereotypical image of a Muslim thinker wrangling with the People of the Book—Jews and Christians—in an effort to prove the supremacy of Islam over other faith systems comes to mind. To be honest, this picture isn’t entirely false, as the combative nature of book titles on the subject demonstrates. Consider the titles of the debates with the Jews, Badhl al-Majhud fi Ifhami ‘l-Yahud (Striving to Silence the Jews by Argument) by Samaw’il al Maghrabi (b. Baghdad 1130, d. Maragha 1180)2 and Al-Intisarat al Islamiyyah fi Kashfi Shibhi ‘l Nasraniyyah (The Islamic Victories in (1259-1316). 3