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Mirrors facing each other

Mirrors facing each other

What is it called when two mirrors facing each other

When you have two mirrors facing each other and thousands of smaller and smaller reflections within each reflection, you know what I’m talking about. Since light moves at a finite speed, shouldn’t it take time for each of these smaller reflections to be produced? Shouldn’t you be able to see each additional reflection appear if you could slow time or have mirrors spaced far enough apart? Help me, science.32 commentssharesavehidereport87 percent UpvotedThis thread has been archived. New comments and votes cannot be posted or cast. Sort by best.

Mirrors facing each other feng shui

In classical physics the electromagnetic waves that produce the reflections are uniform and the energy loss due to the reflection ( depending on the material of the glass) will be what will make the reflections fainter and fainter, but the phase is continuous and the limit will be a limit in luminosity. In theory, a completely reflecting material would have no limit, allowing for infinite reflections as time passes. Maxwell’s equations follow special relativity, i.e. the velocity c of light is finite, as opposed to the original assertion that the wavefronts are instantaneous.
With special relativity in the problem it will take time to reach the next reflection, but even for a complete reflector infinity will also be reached only at infinite time, during observation, though there will be an enormous number of reflections.
Except in a thinking query, a fully reflecting mirror cannot exist quantum mechanically. Absorption and therefore termination of the wavefront will always be a possibility, with the images becoming less and less known until they become individual photons and are ultimately fully absorbed.

Placing two mirrors facing each other superstition

In classical physics, the electromagnetic waves that cause reflections are uniform, and the energy loss due to reflection (which varies depending on the glass material) is what causes the reflections to become fainter and fainter, but the phase is continuous, and the limit would be a luminosity limit. In theory, a fully reflecting material will have no limit, allowing for infinite reflections as time passes. Maxwell’s equations follow special relativity, i.e. the velocity c of light is finite, as opposed to the original assertion that the wavefronts are instantaneous.
With special relativity in the problem it will take time to reach the next reflection, but even for a complete reflector infinity will also be reached only at infinite time, during observation, though there will be an enormous number of reflections.
Except in a thinking query, a fully reflecting mirror cannot exist quantum mechanically. Absorption and therefore termination of the wavefront will always be a possibility, with the images becoming less and less known until they become individual photons and are ultimately fully absorbed.

Can 2 mirrors facing each other create a vortex

Assume I have two mirrors in front of me. They’re perfectly matched and mirror each other. I’m looking through one of them and seeing what appears to be infinite reflections (using the one-sided mirror effect).
b) If I start looking right after turning on the light, it should only take a few seconds for all of the reflections to appear, i.e., it takes time for light to make all of the back and forth trips necessary to produce the very small images. How good a microscope (telescope?) will I need to be able to see the picture being created? That is, to look at a spot and see nothing, then see a picture appear after some epsilon of time.
When you add a probe, you block the infinite perspective point only in the position of the probe, so you’ll never be able to grab it, even though no dissipation happens.
This is the same as saying that any photon hitting the perspective point must be perfectly perpendicular to both mirrors and your probe. You will never see the “bottom of infinity” since it is clearly not true.