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Middlesex county public library

Middlesex county public library

2015 esl conference keynote – middlesex county college

The Middlesex County Public Library dates back to 1915, when fifteen ladies founded a book club with the aim of sharing and enjoying the pleasures of reading together. When the books were borrowed and returned, they were signed on the fly leaf, and some of the original books can still be found on the shelves of the Middlesex County Public Library today. In 1927, the Library received its official charter. In the town of Urbanna, it was located in the Middlesex County Bank building. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) founded a library in Deltaville in the 1930s, but it was closed down in the 1940s. Volunteers reorganized the Deltaville Library in the 1950s, and it was incorporated in 1985.
In 1987, the two libraries combined to form the Middlesex County Public Library, Inc. (MCPL), which is one of Virginia’s eleven independent public libraries. The Urbanna and Deltaville branches house a combined collection of over 36,000 items, including rare books, a comprehensive collection on Middlesex County history, children’s books, and audio and video recordings. Total circulation in Fiscal 2001-02 was over 50,000, with over 37,900 patron visits at the two branches.

Museum offers a slice of jersey diner history

Elly started his career in the NYC music scene after arriving in the United States from the former Soviet Union. He wowed audiences around the country with his rich vocal talent and brilliant sax sounds.
He’ll perform Latin music, jazz classics, pop music from the 1940s to the 1970s, and international hits, alternating between singing and saxophone. In the comfort of your own house, watch Elly’s success on
Simply choose the Friends of the Middlesex Library as your AmazonSmile charity. The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5 percent of the purchase price to the customer’s chosen charitable organization for qualifying AmazonSmile purchases.

Middlesex-london: virtual media briefing – february 1st, 2021

Middlesex Public Library is pleased to announce a partnership with Libraries to Business (L2B) and Information City to offer free skills training to our patrons in order to better prepare them for the workforce of the twenty-first century.

Drag storytime with eve hill & mz affra tighty

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Despite the fact that our building is closed, our hearts are open to the people of Middlesex. During this holiday season, we want to spread good cheer, joy, and hope, and we hope that you are healthy and safe. We at Middlesex Public Library are dedicated to helping you stay on track with your reading.
Shelves for the Holidays! Let’s get into the spirit of the season! Take a look at some of the holiday books and DVDs we have available! If you click on any of the cover images in the scrolling slideshow, a new window will open with the catalog record for that item, and you can order it via our Walkup/Pickup Service! Continue reading to find out how to put an aContinue Reading
MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17TH FROM 5PM TO 7PM! “The Library Express: A Drive Through Polar Express Experience!” is a new drive through service from the Middlesex Public Library. In this adapted interaction version of the beloved children’s tale, imagine your car is The Polar Express and enjoy our winter holidaysContinue Reading

Little red riding hood – glove puppet

The Middlesex County public library dates back to 1915, when fifteen ladies founded a book club with the aim of swapping books and sharing the joys of reading. When the books were borrowed and returned, they were signed on the fly leaf.
In 1927, the Urbanna Library became a legally recognised entity. In the town of Urbanna, it was first located in the Middlesex County Bank building. Before relocating to its new Grace Street site, the Urbanna Library was located in the Virginia Street building, which is now occupied by the Middlesex Women’s Club, and then the Old Tobacco Warehouse.
The United States Works Administration (WPA) founded a library in Deltaville in the 1930s, but it was closed down in the 1940s. Gazelle Ingram was the librarian at this library, which was housed in Ed Gemmell’s grocery store. The intersection of Crittenden Road and Route 33 was where it was. The Deltaville Library was reorganized in the 1950s by two ladies who drove around town with books for circulation in their cars. It was resurrected in the 1980s by a group of volunteers who were able to secure space in the Redman Building.