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Left temporal lobectomy side effects

Types of epilepsy surgery – mayo clinic

Drug-resistant epilepsy characterized by hippocampal sclerosis and damage to the amygdala complex is known as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) (5). The structures of the mesial temporal lobe are important parts of a complex mechanism that controls memory and emotion. As a result, MTLE patients have been reported to have selective memory and emotional deficits. In terms of seizure management and subjectively reported quality of life, MTLE surgery has a significant benefit over medical care (6). While little is known about how surgery affects cognitive functions, there is mounting evidence that functional compensation and reorganization can occur following epilepsy surgery (4).
The type of cognitive dysfunction in people with MTLE varies depending on which side of the brain is damaged: left-sided MTLE is associated with material-specific verbal memory deficits, while right-sided MTLE is associated with spatial memory deficits (7, 8), recognition of famous faces (9), and emotion recognition from facial expressions (1, 3, 10).

Stereotactic laser ablation of amygdala and hippocampus

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Epilepsy surgery side effects misconceptions – mayo clinic

When seizures persist despite medication, pre-surgery examination recognizes an epileptogenic region in the temporal lobe, and the area can be removed without affecting vital areas of the brain, temporal resection is considered./li>

What’s temporal lobe epilepsy? | epilepsy

Surgery can result in full seizure control or “partial” seizure control with less medication use, depending on the nature of your child’s seizures and the location of the epileptogenic zone.

Animated view of amygdalohippocampectomy – transcortical

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Epilepsy surgery: brain grid

When seizures persist despite medication, pre-surgery examination recognizes an epileptogenic region in the temporal lobe, and the area can be removed without affecting vital areas of the brain, temporal resection is considered./li>

Podcast: temporal lobectomy epilepsy surgery

Surgery can result in complete seizure control or “partial” seizure control with less medication use, depending on the nature of your child’s seizures and the location of the epileptogenic region./li>

Waking up after brain surgery!

In North America, the estimated prevalence of epilepsy is 5 to 10 cases per 1000 people, with approximately one-third of those with epilepsy unable to obtain sufficient seizure control with antiepileptic medications or being unable to handle the required side effects. Failure to manage seizures sufficiently impairs memory, lowers overall quality of life, and increases mortality, according to a wide body of evidence.
The first phase in treating epilepsy is medical intervention. When medical treatment fails to achieve seizure freedom through the use of multiple antiepileptic medications, a thorough surgical evaluation is essential. Medial (mesial) temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common and well-known focal epilepsy syndrome (MTLE). An anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy (ATL) is a procedure that allows patients with intractable MTLE to be seizure-free while reducing their dependence on antiepileptic drugs.
From its earliest descriptions by Falconer and Morris over the past century, the ATL has been refined into a safe and successful technique that has been validated with class I proof. In MTLE patients, this treatment has reliably resulted in seizure-free rates of 70% or higher. This chapter discusses the diagnostic and evaluation modalities for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), my surgical approach to MTLE, and the results of surgery.

Temporal lobe resection

We compared improvements in neuropsychological scores in patients who received TL (n = 91) or AH (n = 15) and passed or failed the Wada exam. In all 106 patients, as well as the 20 patients who failed the Wada exam, comparisons were made (12 who had TL and 8 who had AH).
After surgery, no patient developed global amnesia. No variations in pre-surgical or change scores (percentage change after surgery compared to preoperative values) of neuropsychological tests were observed between patients who had TL or AH. Patients in the TL community had more visual memory deficiency (p0.05) among those who failed the Wada exam. There was a clear pattern indicating that TL is linked to more verbal memory problems than AH (p = 0.07). The contralateral Wada score correlated with shift scores in verbal intelligence quotient (p0.01) in TL patients who failed the Wada test, and there was a clear trend toward a correlation with the Wechsler Memory Scale’s logical memory immediate recall version subtest (p = 0.06).