i

Islamic center of rochester

Islamic center of rochester

Interview with president of islamic center of rochester

On December 25, 1975, the Islamic Center was founded. Salahuddin and Sarwat Malik were members of an informal community of around twenty-five Muslim families (seven Pakistani and two Iranian) who had been holding gatherings and religious services in their homes for some time. However, after an incident of discrimination against the Maliks’ older daughter Sumaiya at Allen Creek Elementary School, the community decided to formalize their life, realizing that Muslims in the region required a more formal presence. (After asking Christian and Jewish students to explain their customs, a third-grade teacher declined to allow Sumaiya to describe Muslim and Pakistani celebrations.) The Times Union reported on the incident.
Two Turks, two Iranians, two Americans, two Pakistanis, and two Arabs made up the original founding party. Salahuddin Malik was elected president for a second time and will serve two terms in a row (1975-78). He has been president for a total of eleven years, but only on a part-time basis. From 1975 to 1983, the center leased a space on Monroe Avenue. When the center agreed to construct a permanent site, Salahuddin Malik was president again (1983-87).

Alhamdulillah muhadhara ulienda vizuri twawashukuru wote

Rochester’s Islamic Center was established in 1975. In the Greater Rochester area, the Muslim population has risen from a few hundred in the late 1960s to several thousands today. Muslims born in the United States and those who have adopted Islam, as well as refugees from most Muslim countries around the world, make up the membership of the Islamic Center. The Islamic Center now has over 500 families as active members. The Islamic Center of Rochester’s new building was completed in 1985. It is situated on 4 acres of prime land just 10 minutes from downtown Rochester and the major universities and colleges in the city. I

Islamic center of rochester board president discusses racism

“Since March, it’s been a different world,” she says “According to Asig Iqbal. “We’ve been praying at home, so it’s great to be back at the Islamic Center for congregational prayer; as a family, we’ve missed it a lot.”
Despite the fact that places of worship were cleared to reopen at a 25% capacity earlier this month, ICR President Tabassam Javed said they took their time to make sure careful arrangements were in place.
Since Friday is a significant day of prayer in Islam, the ICR has added two additional prayer services for which congregants must register in advance. But, according to Javed, this isn’t necessary for any of the other prayer days because the attendance isn’t as big.
Additionally, removable plastic sheets will be given for prayer rugs to be discarded at the end of service, and traffic flow in and out of the prayer hall will be monitored — and congregants took note.
“Without the embraces, high fives, handshakes, and casual — you know, people will just finish the prayer and hang out, that kind of thing,” she says “Javed remarked. “That won’t happen, but it’s still a significant achievement.”

Friday family halaqa

In 1975, the SUNNIIslamic Center of Rochester was established. In the Greater Rochester area, the Muslim population has risen from a few hundred in the late 1960s to several thousands today. Muslims born in the United States and those who have adopted Islam, as well as refugees from most Muslim countries around the world, make up the membership of the Islamic Center. The Islamic Center now has over 500 families as active members. The Islamic Center of Rochester’s new building was completed in 1985. It is situated on 4 acres of prime land just 10 minutes from downtown Rochester and the major universities and colleges in the city. It comprises prayer and multipurpose rooms, offices, a library, and a kitchen with a total floor area of over 8,000 square feet. For summer fun, there is a picnic shed next to a pond. The house is fully paid for. Expansion of the Center is being considered in order to address the increasing needs of the Muslim community. The Islamic Center has a full-time Executive Director / Imam, as well as an elected Board of Directors and a Trustees Council. The Board implements the policies and oversees the facilities, services, and day-to-day activities, while the Council establishes policies and is responsible for long-term planning. The Executive Director is in charge of The Center’s education services as well as religious instruction and leadership. On May 30, 2005, a new entry was made.