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Is malleability a chemical property

Is malleability a chemical property

Is reactivity a chemical property

Physical properties are measurable characteristics of matter that characterize its physical condition. Chemical properties, on the other hand, define the chemical structure, composition, and reactivity of matter.
Physical properties that are dependent on the system’s “extent” are known as extensive physical properties. Two gallons of water at 20 degrees Celsius have twice the volume and mass of one gallon of water at 20 degrees Celsius.
Intensive physical properties are independent of the system’s “extent.” When you mix two gallons of water, the temperature stays at 20 degrees (it does not rise to 40 degrees) and the density stays at about 1 gram per ml. Intensive properties are often constants that can be used to determine the identity of a product.
The way an element responds to light in a glowing, reflective manner is characterized by its luster. A metal’s luster is a property. Metals, transition metals, and metalloids are almost all lustrous. Non-metals and gases have a dull appearance. Metals have a number of loosely bound electrons that can interact with light particles (photons) of various energies, which gives them a metallic luster.

Is combustibility a chemical property

Physical properties are measurable characteristics of matter that characterize its physical condition. Chemical properties, on the other hand, define the chemical structure, composition, and reactivity of matter.
Physical properties that are dependent on the system’s “extent” are known as extensive physical properties. Two gallons of water at 20 degrees Celsius have twice the volume and mass of one gallon of water at 20 degrees Celsius.
Intensive physical properties are independent of the system’s “extent.” When you mix two gallons of water, the temperature stays at 20 degrees (it does not rise to 40 degrees) and the density stays at about 1 gram per ml. Intensive properties are often constants that can be used to determine the identity of a product.
The way an element responds to light in a glowing, reflective manner is characterized by its luster. A metal’s luster is a property. Metals, transition metals, and metalloids are almost all lustrous. Non-metals and gases have a dull appearance. Metals have a number of loosely bound electrons that can interact with light particles (photons) of various energies, which gives them a metallic luster.

Volume

Physical properties are measurable characteristics of matter that characterize its physical condition. Chemical properties, on the other hand, define the chemical structure, composition, and reactivity of matter.
Physical properties that are dependent on the system’s “extent” are known as extensive physical properties. Two gallons of water at 20 degrees Celsius have twice the volume and mass of one gallon of water at 20 degrees Celsius.
Intensive physical properties are independent of the system’s “extent.” When you mix two gallons of water, the temperature stays at 20 degrees (it does not rise to 40 degrees) and the density stays at about 1 gram per ml. Intensive properties are often constants that can be used to determine the identity of a product.
The way an element responds to light in a glowing, reflective manner is characterized by its luster. A metal’s luster is a property. Metals, transition metals, and metalloids are almost all lustrous. Non-metals and gases have a dull appearance. Metals have a number of loosely bound electrons that can interact with light particles (photons) of various energies, which gives them a metallic luster.

Density

The composition distinguishes a physical reaction from a chemical reaction. There is a variation in the composition of the substances in question in a chemical reaction; there is a difference in the shape, scent, or clear presentation of a sample of matter in a physical reaction without a change in composition. Despite the fact that we call them “reactions,” no physical reaction is taking place. A change in the elemental composition of the material in question is required for a reaction to occur. As a result, from now on, we’ll simply refer to physical “reactions” as physical changes.
Chemical transformations, on the other hand, are very distinct. When the chemical composition of a material changes, it is called a chemical change. A chemical shift occurs when bonds are broken and new ones are formed. The following are chemical transition indicators:
A chemical reaction is likely to occur when two or more reactants are combined and a change in temperature, color, or other properties is observed. These are not conclusive indicators; a chemical reaction may or may not be taking place. A chemical transition isn’t necessarily accompanied by a change in color. In a non-chemical reaction situation, such as painting a vehicle, changing the color of a material is a physical rather than a chemical transition. This is due to the fact that the car’s composition has remained unchanged. Temperature and color variations can also be caused by both physical and chemical changes. To make a decision, we must first comprehend the cause of the transition.