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Investigative reporters and editors

Investigative reporters and editors

The lorana sullivan lecture series – on investigative

Investigative journalism is an integral aspect of American society because it has the ability to expose and report on major events and issues. For example, in the 1900s, Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle exposed the appalling conditions in Chicago’s meatpacking plants; in the 1970s, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein made the public aware of the Watergate scandal; and, more recently, Brian M. Rosenthal of The New York Times received the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for his exposé of New York City’s taxi industry.
While investigative journalism and conventional journalism have some parallels, it’s important to note that investigative pieces take longer to produce than standard journalistic pieces because of the extensive analysis and interviews that must be conducted. You should enjoy delving into the complexities of the subject you’re investigating if you want to work in investigative reporting. Many interested in pursuing a career as an investigative journalist should consider enrolling in a similar training program, such as a master’s degree in journalism.

Saving investigative journalism: here’s what we can do | matt

Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) is a national nonprofit organization created in 1975 by a core group of experienced investigative journalists who wanted a way to encourage training, support, and collaboration among investigative journalists. “Foster excellence in investigative journalism, which is key to a free society,” says the group’s mission statement.
Every year, the IRE holds a variety of conferences and bootcamps on computer-assisted reporting (CAR). Participants learn “how to interpret data using spreadsheets and databases, map data, or use statistical analysis in your work” at the bootcamps.

Global journalist: reviving investigative journalism

On this radio show, Investigative Reporters and Editors, a nonprofit media group committed to enhancing the quality of investigative reporting, takes you behind the scenes with some of the country’s finest journalists. Attend discussions with award-winning reporters, editors, and producers to learn how they broke some of the year’s most important news.
On this radio show, Investigative Reporters and Editors, a nonprofit media group committed to enhancing the quality of investigative reporting, takes you behind the scenes with some of the country’s finest journalists. Attend discussions with award-winning reporters, editors, and producers to learn how they broke some of the year’s most important news.

Maximum impact: when doc filmmakers team up with

FIRE (Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors) is a network that assists freelance investigative journalists from a variety of backgrounds in producing public-interest investigations, predominantly by offering direct reporting services to individual investigative freelancers.
Our Virtual Newsroom is the umbrella term for all of these facilities. The Virtual Newsroom is made possible by a partnership between FIRE and the national nonprofit Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), which serves as FIRE’s fiscal sponsor and provides analysis and training for the program.
FIRE is completely independent of its funding sources in terms of editorial content. We do not appoint or initiate news, nor do we post, broadcast, or release them in any way. The program chooses ideas from investigative freelancers and assists them in getting their work published in a variety of media outlets.
The needs of freelancers were established, and FIRE was born. In 2015, Project Word, as FIRE was formerly known, published Untold Stories, a nationwide study that showed that freelance journalists faced a number of significant obstacles while doing investigative work.