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I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker

I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker

Dear basketball: the legend of kobe bryant (oscar mix

And the afternoon, and particularly the evening, sleeps so soundly! Long fingers smoothed the surface. It’s either asleep, sleepy, or malingering. I’m lying on the floor beside you and me, stretched out. Should I have the power, after tea, cakes, and ices, to push the moment into its crisis? Still, even though I’ve fasted and prayed, and had my head (now slightly bald) brought in on a platter, I’m no prophet–and this isn’t a big deal; I’ve seen the moment of my glory flicker, and I’ve seen the eternal Footman clutch my coat and snicker. In a nutshell, I was scared.
Prufrock’s inability to confront his fears is revealed once more. His procrastination is palpable in his demeanor. He goes on to explain how his desire to ask “the question” is obvious. His plan is to sleep in the bed, “suffocated by long fingers.” “Here beside you and me,” he says, elaborating on his desire to connect with his lover. He wonders if he’ll ever have the power to force himself to answer “the question.” Given how he has “prayed, wept, and fasted,” he does not believe he is a prophet. What’s more, he’s had his head served on a platter. Does this imply that Prufrock has had visions? Perhaps he’s attempting to make it seem that this whole thing with his love isn’t so serious after all. His glory is behind him, and the “eternal footman” reflects his interaction with death, according to the “flickering” definition. He expresses himself as scared and fearful, despite his arrogance of having lived all there is to live.

T.s. eliot reads: the love song of j. alfred prufrock

The title character of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” invites an anonymous “you” to a social occasion in the first stanza. Prufrock may be muttering to himself or listening directly to the audience. The best clue to the “overwhelming question” is found in the poem’s title. Prufrock cautions readers against prying into other people’s private lives, perhaps as a tip to leave any facts unsolved. However, readers can be perplexed as to how he thinks about cheap hotels.
Prufrock ascends the stairwell, entering a room packed with women, one of whom, readers may presume, is the target of his obnoxious query. The reader overhears Prufrock’s internal monologue at this stage in the poem. He observes himself critically and foresees what the guests would think at the gathering. He tells himself that he still has time to turn around and that he is appropriately attired for the occasion.
Prufrock explains that he has chosen not to ask the issue, but he offers no explanation for his decision. The head on a platter is a reference to John the Baptist, a prophet who was killed by Salome, a wicked queen. The allusion implies that Prufrock was reluctant to press for what he wanted because of an incident at the wedding. The last line’s tense change means that whatever happened now remains in Prufrock’s history.

Fight club (5/5) movie clip – letting yourself become tyler

Lines 75 and 78

The love song of j. alfred prufrock by t. s. eliot (read by

And the afternoon, and particularly the evening, sleeps so soundly!

Mumford and sons opener in burgettstown, pa

Long fingers smoothed the surface.

The remains of the day – animation

I’m tired of being tired of being tired of being tired of being tired of being tired of being tired of being tired or it deceives, I’m lying on the floor beside you and me, stretched out. Lines 79 and 80 Should I have the power, after tea, cakes, and ices, to push the moment into its crisis? Lines 81-83 are the last two lines of the poem. But, though I’ve cried and fasted, cried and prayed, and had my head [slightly bald] brought in on a platter, I’m no prophet—and this isn’t a big deal. Lines 84 and 86 I’ve seen my greatness fade away, and I’ve seen the everlasting Footman clutch my coat and snicker. In a nutshell, I was scared.

I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker

On Thursday, my students and I visited City Mall St. John, which is just a short walk from the University of Medicine. I proposed that I take them out to lunch, but they declined and instead took me. We enjoyed a tasty biriani with mango lassis. “We went on our first date when I was a 28-year-old doctor and my husband [a newly-minted veterinarian] was courting me,” one of the students said. He purchased one bowl of chicken soup and requested another so that he could share it with us. I burst into tears, expecting to be well cared for, only to find out that he was being so cheap. Plus, watching him do that in public was humiliating. ‘Why are you crying?’ he inquired. ‘Oh, we need to be careful about our money and save it,’ he said when I explained why. He comes from a poor village family and is still frugal with his income. I enjoy spending it on occasion. He then chastises me. But I adore him, and he is great with kids.”
I walked down my block to the foot of Sint Oh Tan, crossed busy Strand Lane, and followed a group of women through a fence break and down a small wet market to the piers’ side street. It was a whirlwind of activity. There were four or five piers with large boats filling up with passengers and freight, preparing to depart for Delta ports or, I suppose, up the Ayeyarwady River. Hundreds of 25-30 foot open boats with unmuffled diesel engines ferried passengers and cargo across the Yangon River and back. I’ll return with my camera at some point because it’s full of color, lines, and people. I’m wondering if, when the new bridge over the Yangon River is done in a few years, everybody will just take the bus and the small boats will become a thing of the past? I think about how much I enjoy watching the river traffic from my current location every time I consider moving to a leafier, less congested section of Yangon (and into a cheaper apartment). I asked my brother, who runs a successful landscape painting company (penobscotstudio.com), to paint the view from my window with acrylics.