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Half life of sudafed

Half life of sudafed

Sudafed pseudoephedrine

Pseudoephedrine (PSE) belongs to the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical groups of sympathomimetic drugs. In higher doses, it can be used as a nasal/sinus decongestant, a stimulant, or a wakefulness-promoting agent[2]. [three]
For verification, this section needs further citations. Please contribute to the improvement of this article by citing credible sources. It is possible that unsourced content would be questioned and withdrawn. (Updated December 2011) (To find out when and how to delete this template message, read the instructions at the bottom of this page.) )
Pseudoephedrine is a stimulant that is often used as a decongestant because of its ability to shrink swollen nasal mucous membranes. It decreases tissue hyperemia, edema, and nasal inflammation, both of which are typical side effects of colds and allergies. Increased sinus secretion drainage and the opening of obstructed Eustachian tubes are two other possible benefits. Hypertension is a known side effect of pseudoephedrine, which is caused by the same vasoconstriction action.
Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that can be taken orally or applied topically. The oral preparation, on the other hand, is more likely to cause side effects, such as urinary retention, due to its stimulating properties. (5) [number six] According to one study, pseudoephedrine can be useful as an antitussive medication (suppression of cough). [nine]

Pseudoephedrine side effects

In the care of children, there is little published, objective knowledge about pseudoephedrine and phenylpropanolamine. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of these drugs in children.
In two separate double-blind, parallel-group, single-dose trials, 21 children received either 30 or 60 mg of pseudoephedrine or placebo, and 20 children received either 20 or 37.5 mg of phenylpropanolamine or placebo. Serum pseudoephedrine or phenylpropanolamine concentrations, as well as pulse and blood pressure, were assessed prior to dosing and at intervals up to 7 hours after dosing. These tests were also conducted at 12 and 24 hours in two children who received each prescription, and urine was obtained from 0 to 12 and 12 to 24 hours.
The terminal removal half-lives for pseudoephedrine, 3.1 +/- 0.5 hours, and phenylpropanolamine, 2.6 +/- 0.6 hours, in children were slightly shorter than those observed in adults by other researchers. In the dose ranges analyzed, pharmacokinetics were not dose dependent.

Pseudoephedrine dosage

Pseudoephedrine (PSE) belongs to the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical groups of sympathomimetic drugs. In higher doses, it can be used as a nasal/sinus decongestant, a stimulant, or a wakefulness-promoting agent[2]. [three]
For verification, this section needs further citations. Please contribute to the improvement of this article by citing credible sources. It is possible that unsourced content would be questioned and withdrawn. (Updated December 2011) (To find out when and how to delete this template message, read the instructions at the bottom of this page.) )
Pseudoephedrine is a stimulant that is often used as a decongestant because of its ability to shrink swollen nasal mucous membranes. It decreases tissue hyperemia, edema, and nasal inflammation, both of which are typical side effects of colds and allergies. Increased sinus secretion drainage and the opening of obstructed Eustachian tubes are two other possible benefits. Hypertension is a known side effect of pseudoephedrine, which is caused by the same vasoconstriction action.
Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that can be taken orally or applied topically. The oral preparation, on the other hand, is more likely to cause side effects, such as urinary retention, due to its stimulating properties. (5) [number six] According to one study, pseudoephedrine can be useful as an antitussive medication (suppression of cough). [nine]

Pseudoephedrine mechanism of action

Pseudoephedrine (PSE) belongs to the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical groups of sympathomimetic drugs. In higher doses, it can be used as a nasal/sinus decongestant, a stimulant, or a wakefulness-promoting agent[2]. [three]
For verification, this section needs further citations. Please contribute to the improvement of this article by citing credible sources. It is possible that unsourced content would be questioned and withdrawn. (Updated December 2011) (To find out when and how to delete this template message, read the instructions at the bottom of this page.) )
Pseudoephedrine is a stimulant that is often used as a decongestant because of its ability to shrink swollen nasal mucous membranes. It decreases tissue hyperemia, edema, and nasal inflammation, both of which are typical side effects of colds and allergies. Increased sinus secretion drainage and the opening of obstructed Eustachian tubes are two other possible benefits. Hypertension is a known side effect of pseudoephedrine, which is caused by the same vasoconstriction action.
Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that can be taken orally or applied topically. The oral preparation, on the other hand, is more likely to cause side effects, such as urinary retention, due to its stimulating properties. (5) [number six] According to one study, pseudoephedrine can be useful as an antitussive medication (suppression of cough). [nine]