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Excerpts from the jungle by upton sinclair questions and answers

Excerpts from the jungle by upton sinclair questions and answers

The little prince by antoine de saint exupery (book summary

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“diverse sentients could live in mutual symbiosis” graham

“I was aiming for the public’s heart, but I hit it in the stomach by mistake.” Those were the terms used by Upton Sinclair to characterize the reaction to his novel The Jungle when it was first published. Sinclair’s aim was to depict the plight of immigrants in Chicago at the turn of the century, using descriptions and examples of violations in the meatpacking industry to demonstrate their difficulties. Instead of being only one example of many struggles, those cases, which were exposed in less than twelve pages, became both a rallying cry for workplace violence and a public understanding of the novel’s overall theme.
The Jungle first appeared in serial form in 1905 in the socialist newspaper Appeal to Reason. Sinclair was hired to write an expose on the Chicago stockyards’ working conditions. Sinclair’s novel was well-received, and it sparked a backlash towards the meatpacking industry.
The Jungle’s harsh realities and contentious subjects made it difficult to find a publisher for a bound edition. Only after Doubleday, Page, and Company investigated the allegations in Sinclair’s book did they agree to print it in 1906.

The progressive era: crash course us history #27

Significance: In preparation for writing The Jungle, Sinclair disguised himself as a worker and went to Chicago meatpacking plants to witness firsthand the harsh working conditions and pollution of the meat products for America’s dinner tables. Despite his attempt to draw attention to the plight of exploited employees, public outrage centered on the meat industry’s unsanitary conditions, leading to the introduction of federal food-inspection regulations.
The Jungle, a muckraking novel by Upton Sinclair, portrays the lives of Lithuanian refugees lured from their homeland to the dark heart of America—Chicago and the meatpacking industry that kills them physically and spiritually. The socialist Sinclair borrowed the idea of the personality made helpless by overwhelming natural and sociopolitical forces that reduce humans to animals trapped in a pit from nineteenth-century French naturalists such as Émile Zola.
Despite being a mediocre book, The Jungle was a best seller that is still widely read in the twenty-first century, and it was a driving force behind the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, which led to the establishment of the Food and Drug Administration.

The jungle by upton sinclair | chapter 14

The original version of Upton Sinclair’s classic novel has remained practically unknown for nearly a century. It was a complete third longer when it was serialized in 1905 than the censored, commercial version published in book form the following year. Most of the ethnic flavor of the original, as well as some omissions, were edited out in the commercial version.
The original version of Upton Sinclair’s classic novel has remained practically unknown for nearly a century. It was a complete third longer when it was serialized in 1905 than the censored, commercial version published in book form the following year. Most of the ethnic flavor of the original, as well as some of the goriest depictions of the meat-packing industry and much of Sinclair’s most pointed social and political commentary, were edited out of the commercial version. This latest edition’s text is the same as the original uncensored edition from 1905. Rather than the 31 chapters of the expurgated edition, it includes the complete 36 chapters as originally written. A new foreword recounts the original edition’s discovery and subsequent suppression in the 1980s, while a new introduction contextualizes the novel by illustrating the pattern of censorship in the shorter commercial edition.