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Essays to do good

Essays to do good

Cotton mather on witchcraft

1. SUCH Glorious Things are Spoken in the Oracles of our Good God, concerning those who Devise Good, that A Book of Good De|vices, may very fairly de|mand Attention & Acceptance from those who have some Impressions of Reasonable Reli|gion upon them. I’m writing such a book, but I’m also offering a somber demonstration, that if men set their minds to do good, a world of good could be created, far more than there is now in this Evil World. It is undeniable that the world has sufficient needs. There is much that needs to be accomplished in order for the Great GOD and His CHRIST to be better known and served in the world, and for the errors that obstruct the acknowledgments in which men can glorify their Creator and Redeemer to be corrected. There is much work to be done in order to reform the world’s evil ways, which are drowning men in perdition, and to save humanity from the epidemic of corruption and slavery that has engulfed it. There’s a lot of dancing to be done.

Beyond the great divide…

The most recent of the influential 16th to 19th-century books in the life of American evangelist James Brainerd Taylor (1801-1829) was Essays To Do Good: addressed to all Christians, whether in public or private capacities, which I was reading as I plodded away at reading some of the influential 16th to 19th-century books in the life of the American evangelist James Brainerd Taylor (1801-1829). (abridged title).
Essays To Do Good, written in 1710, was influential among American and British Christians until the mid-nineteenth century. It was considered one of the most significant books of the early eighteenth century by Harvard historian Perry Miller (1905-1963).
Even the non-Christian (Deist) Benjamin Franklin was influenced by the work (1706-1790). When he was eleven years old, the renowned American ambassador, statesman, and scientist read the work. He pretended to be a middle-aged widow named Silence Dogood when he was sixteen, drawing on the book’s theme. From April to October 1722, the New England Courant published fourteen satirical letters written under the pen name Silence Dogood. Fix a time, now and then, for more deliberate thoughts on the issue, ‘What good can I do today?’ without abridging yourself from your occasional thoughts on it. Can’t you find time (once a week, perhaps on Lord’s Day/Sunday) to ask this question: ‘What is there that I may do in the service of the glorious Lord, and for the welfare of those for whom I should be concerned?’ (Page 35)

Publications of the narraga…

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Cotton Mather, a socially and politically prominent New England Puritan preacher, prolific author, and pamphleteer (A.B. 1678, Harvard College), A.M. 1681, honorary doctorate 1710 (University of Glasgow), was a prolific author and pamphleteer. Increase Mather’s uncle, Cotton Mather, was a powerful minister. He is well-known for his involvement in the Salem witch trials. Mather was named after both his paternal and maternal grandfathers.
Cotton Mather, a socially and politically prominent New England Puritan preacher, prolific author, and pamphleteer (A.B. 1678, Harvard College), A.M. 1681, honorary doctorate 1710 (University of Glasgow), was a prolific author and pamphleteer. Increase Mather’s uncle, Cotton Mather, was a powerful minister. He is well-known for his involvement in the Salem witch trials. Mather was named after both his paternal (Richard Mather) and maternal (Richard Mather) grandfathers (John Cotton). At the age of 16, he attended Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard in 1678. He joined his father as assistant pastor of Boston’s original North Church (not to be confused with the Anglican/Episcopal Old North Church) after finishing his post-graduate studies. Mather did not fully assume his duties as Pastor at the Church until his father died in 1723. Cotton Mather’s literary works made him one of America’s most prominent religious figures, with over 450 books and pamphlets to his credit. Mather set the nation’s “moral tone,” urging second and third generation Puritans, whose parents had fled England for the New England colonies of North America, to return to Puritanism’s theological roots.

The christian philosopher

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The original is a facsimile reprint of this rare antiquarian text. It may have flaws such as markings, notations, marginalia, and missing pages due to its age. We have made this work available as part of our dedication to protecting, preserving, and supporting the world’s literature in accessible, high-quality, modern editions that are true to the original work because we believe it is culturally significant.
I read Ben Franklin’s autobiography earlier this year, and it was listed as having influenced Franklin’s public service career. I can see the impact now that I’ve read both this and Franklin’s books. I considered sections of Mather’s book to be well-written, thought-provoking, and even inspirational. At the same time, I considered most of the advice provided to particular occupations in the book’s later sections to be redundant and irrelevant to modern circumstances.