d

Driving with dead people

Driving with dead people

“shame on you!” policeman belittles gawkers after fatal truck

Monica Holloway develops a fascination with the nearby funeral home when she is nine years old. Monica is doomed to be a morbid child, with a father who drives his Ford pickup with a Kodak movie camera strapped to his hip in case he sees an accident, and whose home movies contain more footage of disasters than of his children. Despite her father’s warnings, she continues.
This book was written by a woman who grew up in my neighborhood. In high school, she was a year behind me. In this memoir, she has changed all of the names of people and places, however I remembered them all. Her story demonstrates that you never know what is really going on in another person’s life.
This book was written by a woman who grew up in my neighborhood. In high school, she was a year behind me. In this memoir, she has changed all of the names of people and places, however I remembered them all. Her story demonstrates that you never know what is really going on in another person’s life.
I wish there had been obvious signs of destruction on all of us kids, such as bruises or burn marks, to demonstrate how abusive our home was, but words and neglect leave no visible marks.
3.5 out of 5 stars Despite the fact that it had a slow start, I read this book in two sittings. I liked how the author’s outlook matured as she grew older. All seemed perfect to her as she explained events that occurred to her at the beginning of the book from the perspective of a child. Describe yourself

Driver learns a dead body doesn’t count for using a hov lane

Monica Holloway is fascinated by the nearby funeral home when she is nine years old. With a father who drives his Ford pickup with a Kodak movie camera strapped to the back seat in case he sees an accident, and whose home movies contain more disaster footage than footage of his children, it’s no surprise. Monica becomes fast friends with Julie Kilner, whose father is the town mortician, in between her father’s bouts of aggression and harassment. Julie and she preferred the casket showroom to the parks and grassy backyards of Elk Grove, Ohio, where they would take turns lying in their favorite coffins. Monica and Julie eventually get a job driving the company hearse to pick up bodies from the airport, but even her increasing independence can’t shield Monica from her parents’ irresponsibility, or the feeling that she doesn’t deserve to be protected. When she eventually sets out on her own, she has no idea that her parents’ greatest betrayal is yet to be uncovered…

Driver leaves passenger for dead after crashing | 9 news

Monica Holloway is fascinated by the nearby funeral home when she is nine years old. With a father who drives his Ford pickup with a Kodak movie camera strapped to the back seat in case he sees an accident, and whose home movies contain more disaster footage than footage of his children, it’s no surprise. Monica becomes fast friends with Julie Kilner, whose father is the town mortician, in between her father’s bouts of aggression and harassment. Julie and she preferred the casket showroom to the parks and grassy backyards of Elk Grove, Ohio, where they would take turns lying in their favorite coffins. Monica and Julie eventually get a job driving the company hearse to pick up bodies from the airport, but even her increasing independence can’t shield Monica from her parents’ irresponsibility, or the feeling that she doesn’t deserve to be protected. When she eventually sets out on her own, she has no idea that her parents’ greatest betrayal is yet to be uncovered…” “Driving with Dead People” is a page-turning, tragic, and hilarious read. Monica Holloway has the power to break your heart and make you laugh out loud in the same sentence. Her memoir has the pace of a good mystery book, the kind that makes you want to stay up all night reading to find out what happens to the protagonist because you care so much about her. This is a beautiful debut from a writer who takes tough material and transforms it into something fresh and moving.” Author of “Writing Out the Storm” and “Courage & Craft,” Barbara Abercrombie

‘the sixth sense’ “i see dead people” scene | rotten

Monica Holloway’s prose shines with charm, clear-eyed beauty, and an extraordinary sense of courage throughout Driving with Dead People, a remarkable memoir of her dysfunctional, quirky, and wholly unforgettable family. Driving with Dead People is a spectacular tale with a fantastically observant and resourceful heroine—a story that is all the more impressive because it is real.
Monica Holloway develops a fascination with the nearby funeral home when she is nine years old. Monica is doomed to be a morbid child, with a father who drives his Ford pickup with a Kodak movie camera strapped to his hip in case he sees an accident, and whose home movies contain more footage of disasters than of his children.
Monica never succumbs to despair, despite her father’s bouts of aggression and abuse, her mother’s selfishness and prim denial, and her siblings’ personal battles and betrayals. Instead, she forges her own course, excelling in school and making quick friends with Julie Kilner, the town mortician’s son.