d

Declaration of sentiments and resolutions pdf

Declaration of sentiments and resolutions pdf

Declaration of sentiments and resolutions answer key

In 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott convened a meeting in Seneca Falls, New York, of 300 women and men to outline a list of demands for women’s equality. A collection of grievances aimed at the male-led government was included in the Declaration of Sentiments, which was modeled after the United States Declaration of Independence. Sixty-eight women and thirty-two men, including Frederick Douglass, signed it. Before the Civil War broke out in 1861, women’s rights leaders organized annual conferences.
You may also be interested in
John Adams is reminded by Abigail Adams to “Remember the Ladies” (with text supports)
A Citizen Discusses the Impact of the New Deal on His Life (with text supports)
A citizen raises concerns about the New Deal’s relief programs (with text supports)
A Clergyman Advocates for a More Bold New Deal (with text supports)
Concerns about the New Deal from a Clergyman (with text supports)
A WPA Employee Is Prepared to Battle (with text supports)

Declaration of sentiments transcript

When, in the course of human events, it becomes inevitable for one segment of the human family to assume a role among the peoples of the world that is different from that which they have held previously, but to which the laws of nature and the God of nature entitle them, a fair regard for mankind’s views demands that they state the reasons for their decision.
When any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, those who suffer from it have the right to deny allegiance to it and demand the establishment of a new government, based on those principles and organizing its forces in such a way that it appears to them to be most likely to affect their protection and happiness.
Prudence would dictate that long-established governments should not be altered for petty reasons; and, as a result, all history has shown that mankind is more inclined to suffer when evils are bearable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they have become accustomed.

Declaration of sentiments reading

The Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments, is a document signed in 1848 by 68 women and 32 men, representing 100 of the 300 people who attended the first women’s rights conference organized by women. The convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York, and is now known as the Seneca Falls Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was the primary author of the Declaration, which was based on the United States Declaration of Independence. Along with Lucretia Coffin Mott and Martha Coffin Wright, she was a key organizer of the convention.
The document was the “grand movement for attaining the legal, social, political, and religious rights of women,” according to the North Star, which was written by Frederick Douglass, whose attendance at the convention and sponsorship of the Declaration helped pass the resolutions put forward.
[two]
[3] When, in the course of human events, it becomes appropriate for one portion of the human family to assume among the peoples of the earth a role different from that which they have previously held, but one to which the laws of nature and the God of nature entitle them, a fair respect for mankind’s views demands that they state the reasons for their decision.

Declaration of sentiments worksheet pdf

The Seneca Falls Convention in New York in July 1848 produced the Declaration of Sentiments, a text defining the rights that American women should have as citizens. Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Mary Ann McClintock met three days before the convention to put together the agenda for the conference as well as the speeches that would be given. The Declaration of Sentiments was based on the Declaration of Independence and was written specifically by Stanton to parallel the struggles of the Founding Fathers with those of the women’s movement. The Declaration of Sentiments was one of the first declarations of political and social repression of American women, and its publication, along with the Seneca Falls Convention, marked the beginning of the women’s rights movement in the United States.
Who wrote the Declaration of Independence for the United States of America? Who composed the national anthem of the United States of America? Take this quiz to learn more about American history and politics, from the Constitution to the chambers on Capitol Hill.