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Clothes in the past

Clothes in the past

Clothing and fashion

Ordinary people, of course, did not have the huge wardrobes that we have today. They got by with one outfit for every day, one for Sunday best, and maybe another, or parts of another, for seasonal change. Even the wealthy didn’t always have a lot of clothing, though their wealth allowed them to buy ready-made goods from the storekeeper, hire custom sewing done outside the home, or hire a temporary live-in seamstress.
Where and how a family got their clothes was largely dictated by where they lived. Fabrics, if not whole garments, were commonly purchased from specialty or general stores by city and town dwellers. People who lived in rural or remote areas were more likely to do it themselves. Even so, virtually everyone could order almost anything from a merchant in the next town, or even from a merchant thousands of miles away. It just took a long time to get there.
In the 1830s, there was a wide range of fabrics available for producing clothing. All of the fabrics were “natural,” with wool and linen being the most common, and cotton and silk being rarer and more costly. There were hundreds of weaves and designs to choose from.

Clothing then and now

Clothing and textile history is the study of the evolution, use, and availability of clothing and textiles throughout human history. Clothing and textiles are a reflection of the fabrics and technologies available in various cultures at various times. Within a society, the variety and distribution of clothing and textiles show social customs and culture.
Clothing is an exclusively human trait that is present in almost all cultures. Following the last Ice Age, men and women started to wear clothing. Animal skins and vegetation were adapted into coverings as protection from cold, heat, and rain, according to anthropologists, particularly as humans migrated to new climates.
Textiles, which first appeared in the Middle East during the late Stone Age, can be felt or spun fibers made into yarn and then netted, looped, knit, or woven to create fabrics.
1st Methods of textile production have advanced (with technology) from ancient times to the present day, and the textiles available have affected how people carried their belongings, dressed themselves, and adorned their surroundings. [two]

Relating to fashion of the past

Ordinary people, of course, did not have the huge wardrobes that we have today. They got by with one outfit for every day, one for Sunday best, and maybe another, or parts of another, for seasonal change. Even the wealthy didn’t always have a lot of clothing, though their wealth allowed them to buy ready-made goods from the storekeeper, hire custom sewing done outside the home, or hire a temporary live-in seamstress.
Where and how a family got their clothes was largely dictated by where they lived. Fabrics, if not whole garments, were commonly purchased from specialty or general stores by city and town dwellers. People who lived in rural or remote areas were more likely to do it themselves. Even so, virtually everyone could order almost anything from a merchant in the next town, or even from a merchant thousands of miles away. It just took a long time to get there.
In the 1830s, there was a wide range of fabrics available for producing clothing. All of the fabrics were “natural,” with wool and linen being the most common, and cotton and silk being rarer and more costly. There were hundreds of weaves and designs to choose from.

Clothes from the past ks1

prompted by an online question from a friend I found that a couple of my favorite study analysis and retention techniques aren’t usually taught in school. A little background: I have a master’s degree in costume history, but I have mild dyslexia and am a visual kinetic learner, which means that the things I learn the most easily are those that require muscle memory, so reading and writing have never been my strong suits. I’ve found that people often equate knowledge with the ability to learn traditional research methods when, in reality, they need alternative research methods.
It’s easy to put together a basic soft kit for most time periods, but I’ve found that people are often distracted by items that don’t help differentiate the representation from a generic medieval individual. While a simple hood and tunic can be worn for a variety of times, changing the shape and hem length, as well as adding a pair of hosen, can offer a more centered look. Changing the fabric of the garments, whether it’s better quality or rougher quality, may also alter the image of a wealthy servant versus a field worker. Small improvements that go unnoticed can have a significant effect on your overall appearance. Although this handout focuses on 14th century clothes, the essential points can be extended to most impressions.