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Classics of criminology 4th edition

Classics of criminology 4th edition

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Jacoby (Bowling Green State University) has compiled 65 criminology readings, with 17 of them being new to this edition. The readings are divided into parts on classic descriptions of crime, theories of causation of crime, and the social reaction to crime, and span the field’s history from 1764 to 1992. Both writers whose work is widely recognized are included in the series.
It’s time for more classwork. This book was fascinating at times and incredibly difficult at others to comprehend. Thank goodness for Dr. B’s excellent lessons, without which this book would not have made as much sense. Again, from a criminal justice standpoint, critical thinking is needed. My CRJ 102 class and the way it was taught during the semester were both outstanding.

Crashcourse

Joseph Jacoby continues to provide classic academic works on criminology in their original form with his current co-editors, Theresa Severance and Alan Bruce, enabling readers to share in the exploration and unfolding of powerful ideas in the authors’ own words. The most influential approaches to, theories of, and social reactions to crime can be found in these writings from the past two centuries. Seventy-five choices are included in the Fourth Edition, with thirteen of them being new to this edition. This extensive volume includes both authors whose work is generally known as important in and of itself, as well as authors whose work has had a significant impact on subsequent scholars’ thought.
This comprehensive compilation is divided into three parts, each of which begins with a contextualizing editorial introduction. Section I, The Classic Descriptions of Crime, includes writings that are mostly descriptive in nature, but which include valuable theoretical perspectives. These studies shed a lot of light on some facets of the criminal phenomenon. Section II, Theories of Crime Causation, delves into more than two decades of study into the causes of crime. The majority of these articles are about violence, though some focus on broader social problems that have direct criminological consequences. Writings in Section III, The Social Response to Crime, identify, theorize about, or advocate particular social responses to crime. Here are some of the best works on the criminal justice system as it operates both internally and in its societal context.

Ghostface 2019

“The organization of the novel, the brevity of the pages, and the inclusion of some of the most important original writings, which are often hard to come by, were all quite appealing to me. This would be an excellent complement to any criminology textbook because it introduces students to a lot more than they will learn in the text (and leaves out a lot of valuable information).” —John Jay College’s Gohar Petrossian “This is a text that is extremely resilient and adaptable. It can be used not only as a stand-alone text for upper- and lower-division courses, but also as a supplement.” Southern Oregon University’s Brian Fedorek “A fantastic selection of classic criminology writings. I appreciate the latest readings being included.” Radford University’s Riane Bolin
The book’s references predate the 1964 Civil Rights Act and use racial language. The statistics are inaccurate, and the material is plainly sexist and racist. On page 33, it notes that all negro males victimize themselves, and on page 32, it states that “Negro males more often provoke females of their own race to slay them than they do members of their own sex and race,” which is not valid and explicitly contradictory. The book also wrongly compares race and gender, with only negros without a gender in some cases. This book is not appropriate for academic use and should not be recommended.

Chapter 1

“This edition contains an impressive, up-to-date selection of criminology classics. For a full understanding of theoretical criminology, original sources are required.” Norfolk State University’s Mike Fischer
“The organization of the novel, the brevity of the pages, and the inclusion of some of the most important original writings, which are often hard to come by, were all quite appealing to me. This would be an excellent complement to any criminology textbook because it introduces students to a lot more than they will learn in the text (and leaves out a lot of valuable information).” —John Jay College’s Gohar Petrossian “This is a text that is extremely resilient and adaptable. It can be used not only as a stand-alone text for upper- and lower-division courses, but also as a supplement.” Southern Oregon University’s Brian Fedorek