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Arts with the brain in mind

Arts with the brain in mind

Environments for learning

What is the status of the arts as a major discipline? What impact do they have on the brain, learning, and human growth? What are the best ways for schools to develop and evaluate an arts program? In this book, Eric Jensen addresses these and other questions. Many lawmakers are cutting arts initiatives in order to press for higher learning requirements. That, according to Jensen, is a mistake. This book provides an overview of the
What is the status of the arts as a major discipline? What impact do they have on the brain, learning, and human growth? What are the best ways for schools to develop and evaluate an arts program? In this book, Eric Jensen addresses these and other questions. Many lawmakers are cutting arts initiatives in order to press for higher learning requirements. That, according to Jensen, is a mistake. This book makes the case for making arts a central part of the basic curriculum and thoughtfully incorporating them into every topic, based on what we know about the brain and learning. Separate chapters look at the musical, visual, and kinesthetic arts and how they affect learning. What are the outcomes of a well-executed arts program? As a result of the proof, the following conclusions can be drawn: * Less dropouts* Higher attendance* Better team members * A greater love of learning* Greater student dignity* Increased creativity* A more qualified citizen for tomorrow’s workplace* As a bonus, greater cultural knowledge Jensen does not believe that one must choose between musical and kinesthetic arts. Rather, consider what kind of art is appropriate for which purposes. How much time do you spend each day? What ages are you talking about? What kind of music are you listening to? What kind of movement are you talking about? Is it necessary to study the arts? What criteria do we use to evaluate arts programs? Jensen offers hundreds of realistic, detailed ideas for integrating the arts into every classroom in response to these real-world questions.

Introduction to brain‑co…

What is the status of the arts as a major discipline? What impact do they have on the brain, learning, and human growth? What are the best ways for schools to develop and evaluate an arts program? In this book, Eric Jensen addresses these and other questions. Many lawmakers are cutting arts initiatives in order to press for higher learning requirements. That, according to Jensen, is a mistake. This book makes the case for making arts a central part of the basic curriculum and thoughtfully incorporating them into every topic, based on what we know about the brain and learning. Separate chapters look at the musical, visual, and kinesthetic arts and how they affect learning. What are the outcomes of a well-executed arts program? As a result of the proof, the following conclusions can be drawn: * Less dropouts* Higher attendance* Better team members * A greater love of learning* Greater student dignity* Increased creativity* A more qualified citizen for tomorrow’s workplace* As a bonus, greater cultural knowledge Jensen does not believe that one must choose between musical and kinesthetic arts. Rather, consider what kind of art is appropriate for which purposes. How much time do you spend each day? What ages are you talking about? What kind of music are you listening to? What kind of movement are you talking about? Is it necessary to study the arts? What criteria do we use to evaluate arts programs? Jensen offers hundreds of realistic, detailed ideas for integrating the arts into every classroom in response to these real-world questions.

Brain‑based learning: the new…

A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that art improves brain function. It affects brain wave patterns, feelings, and the nervous system, as well as raising serotonin levels. Art has the power to transform a person’s perspective and perception of the world.
Decades of studies have accumulated more than enough evidence to show that arts education has a positive effect on everything from overall academic performance to social and emotional health, among other things. According to research, the arts build neural mechanisms that result in a wide range of benefits, including fine motor skills, imagination, and enhanced emotional balance. Simply put, the arts are important for our individual and collective well-being.
Education and participation in the fine arts are beneficial to the educational process for many reasons, including evidence from brain science. “The processes they nourish, which include our integrated sensory, attentional, cognitive, emotional, and motor capacities, are, in reality, the driving forces behind all other learning,” writes Eric Jensen, one of the leading translators of neuroscience into education in his book Arts with the Brain in Mind.

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Although it is true that arts education will help students improve their test scores in other subjects, here is a book that discusses the most important reason for including the arts in the classroom: brain growth. Jensen makes the definitive argument for making the arts a central part of the curriculum and fundamental to teaching in any subject and classroom, based on the most recent studies on the brain and learning. Learn how to use musical, visual, and kinesthetic arts to expand students’ learning opportunities, improve their thinking, and make classrooms more supportive and inclusive. Throughout the book, teaching tips include simple and realistic ways to integrate the arts into any grade level.
Many lawmakers are cutting arts initiatives in order to press for higher learning requirements. This book makes the case for making the arts a central part of the basic curriculum and thoughtfully incorporating them into every topic, based on what we know about the brain and learning. Separate chapters look at the musical, visual, and kinesthetic arts and how they affect learning. Evidence suggests that a fully integrated arts curriculum results in less dropouts, higher retention, better team members, a greater enjoyment of learning, greater student dignity, improved innovation, a better educated individual for tomorrow’s workplace, and, as a bonus, greater cultural knowledge. To respond to a variety of questions about the arts, such as: What kind of art is appropriate for what purposes? How much time do you spend each day? What ages are you talking about? Is it necessary to study the arts? What criteria should be used to evaluate arts programs? —the book includes hundreds of comprehensive, realistic ideas for integrating the arts into every classroom. A list of additional services is included in the appendix. An comprehensive bibliography is also included. (Byte)