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Antibiotic resistance lab report

Antibiotic resistance lab report

Bacterial transformation

Novel methods for assessing the response of bacteria to antibiotics in a timely manner are urgently needed. Antibiotics are usually evaluated by measuring their impact on bacteria in a culture medium for 24–48 hours and using only one parameter, namely growth. We present a multiparameter approach at the single-cell level that takes around an hour to correctly identify susceptible and resistant strains after spiking the culture. We monitor the evolution of motility and morphology of individual bacteria after drug administration by hydrodynamically trapping hundreds of bacteria. We demonstrate how this combined detection approach offers information about antimicrobial activity at the onset of action that single parameter and conventional tests cannot provide. Our findings add to the existing growth-based methods and stress the need for potential antimicrobial susceptibility studies to recognize multiple factors.

Bacterial transformation

Undergraduate Field Experience in the Microbiology Classroom Dr. Mangala Tawde is an Associate Professor in Queensborough Community College’s Department of Biological Sciences and Geology. Undergraduate Research (UR) is becoming more widely accepted as one of the most transformative experiences students can have during their undergraduate years. Integrating authentic research experiences in the classroom is crucial to make it available to all students, and it is a major initiative at Queensborough Community College, where we have institutionalized UR as a High Impact Practice. In the Microbiology course for allied health majors, we included an authentic research project. The aim of the study was to isolate and classify antibiotic-resistant microbes from a variety of settings. Students become involved and enthusiastically engaged in the research project as they learn that antibiotic resistance is a significant problem in today’s medicine. Students gather soil samples from a number of habitats and locations, then isolate and identify bacteria that may be resistant to antibiotics. Biochemical tests and 16s rRNA sequence analysis are used to classify microbes isolated from different environments. The research experience is important and fits well with the course curricula, learning objectives, and general education goals of the institution.

Testing an antibiotic using a disk diffusion assay – kirby

Penicillin’s discovery was a significant game-changer for humanity in the twentieth century. We obtained a shield against an unseen foe with the unexpected discovery of antibiotics. Many other antibiotics have been produced since the discovery of Penicillin for use against a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria, each with its own set of strengths and weaknesses. Unfortunately, overuse in recent decades has blunted this arm, resulting in antibiotic resistance.
Students will investigate a variety of antibiotics and evaluate their effectiveness against E. coli in this realistic. Students can acquire aseptic technique expertise. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about susceptibility, resistance, and inhibition as they relate to microbes and antimicrobials. They’ll also discover that antibiotics aren’t universal, and that one that works against one bacteria species might not work against another.
The control plate should have an even lawn with bacteria over the surface after 24 hours, while the experiment plate should have a lawn over the majority of the plate except for rings around the Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol disks (the zones of inhibition). A list of expected results and diameters is given below.

New test detects antibiotic resistance in minutes

Through a partnership between a four-year university and a community college, we intend to provide undergraduate students in a variety of biology courses with an authentic research experience. Antibiotic resistance is the subject of this lab series, which teaches transferable and universal skills. Since the late 1940s, antibiotics have been important in the treatment of infectious diseases. In the fight against infectious diseases, antibiotic resistance has become a growing concern. We are especially interested in detecting a group of ampicillin resistance genes. Students use PCR and gel electrophoresis to detect genes (Bla-1, Bla-SHV, and Bla-TEM) encoding for different -lactamases that confer ampicillin resistance in this curricular research experience. Although contributing to ongoing primary research, students gain an understanding of core biological concepts such as scientific method, cell structure, genetics, the function of the environment, and application of molecular biology techniques through a series of experiments.