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Air force satellite control network

Air force satellite control network

How many military satellites does indian armed forces have

The United States Space Force has hit a one-year milestone with its space situational awareness tool, which allows users to see satellite activities in real time. The “Space Cockpit” platform was created as part of the Space Force’s Space Commercially Augmented Mission Platform (CAMP) program and became operational on Nov. 11, 2019, according to the service branch.
Space Cockpit is a customizable device that gives operators access to the Air Force’s Satellite Control Network as well as various cyber defense capabilities for space-focused mission systems. It was first introduced to the Space Force’s Delta 6 portion.
Space Cockpit simulates live data to allow operators to identify satellite positions and quickly perform actions to mitigate threats, according to 1st Lt. Jacqueline Cromer, a space development lead for Space CAMP.
The United States Army has approved a capability development document aimed at accelerating the testing and development of navigation warfare and situational awareness technologies. During the PNT Assessment Exercise and Project Convergence 21, the team hopes to test and demonstrate prototype NAVWAR-SA technologies.

Pacific spotlight: maj. jesse diaz, 21st space operations

At Schriever Air Force Base in Colorado, schedulers from the 22nd Space Operations Squadron use electronic scheduling distribution to track the Air Force Satellite Control Network on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. On average, the network supports more than 170 satellites 24 hours a day, seven days a week. (Photo courtesy of the United States Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes)
Brian Honor, a satellite network scheduler with the 22nd Space Operations Squadron, controls the Air Force Satellite Control Network’s schedule using electronic scheduling distribution at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. The network is a global network of antennas that provide users with time and a connection to their satellites. (Photo courtesy of the United States Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes)
On Wednesday, April 5, 2017, Maj. Gregory Stewart, mission commander of the 22nd Space Operations Squadron, supervises the Air Force Satellite Control Network schedulers at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The schedulers serve the 50th Space Wing’s divisions, as well as other Air Force Space Command missions and other government agencies including NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (Photo courtesy of the United States Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes)

Deployable communication information system (dcis

Under a $63.3 million contract option, CACI International’s national security solutions company will continue to assist the US Air Force in maintaining and operating a satellite control network at various task sites.
As part of its efforts to promote commercial nuclear fusion projects, the General Atomics-managed DIII-D National Fusion Facility has established a compact nuclear reactor design. The Compact Advanced Tokamak design for the DIII-D facility is based on the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s high-performance computing activities as well as the DIII-D team’s plasma physics studies, according to General Atomics.
Austal USA broke ground in Mobile, Alabama on a proposed shipbuilding facility that will produce steel vessels for the US Navy and Coast Guard. The steel shipbuilding facility, which broke ground on Friday, will complement Austal USA’s aluminum construction operations and allow for lean manufacturing processes, the company said Monday.

Hacker team wins $50,000 for hacking a dod satellite at

Customer Applications » Intelligent Space Applications & Success Stories » U.S. Air Force Space Operations » Home» Products » Aurora » Customer Applications » Intelligent Space Applications & Success Stories » U.S. Air Force Space Operations » Air Force Satellite Control Network Controlled Intelligent Deconfliction and Scheduling
Hundreds of satellite communication requests from different users are coordinated by the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) every day. MIDAS (Managed Intelligent Deconfliction and Scheduling) is a method that enables AFSCN satellite communication requests to be scheduled and deconflicted quickly. Previously, these requirements were solely met by teams of highly qualified and professional schedulers manually reviewing each scheduling request. Approximately half of all requests need to be tweaked to eliminate conflicts. Much of this is now automated by MIDAS, enabling schedulers to focus their skills where they are most required. It achieves this through a two-stage process that shuffles tasks within their specified constraints before implementing a user-definable set of business rules that allows those constraints to be relaxed as required. To encourage comparison and enable users to migrate from one interface to the other with relative ease, the system offers a familiar, user-friendly interface modeled after legacy Electronic Schedule Dissemination (ESD) systems. It runs on low-cost market hardware and interacts with legacy systems via a well-defined plain-text file format: raw scheduling requests are imported into MIDAS, and scheduling results can be exported back to legacy systems. This method can be used to quickly resolve real-world downlink scheduling conflicts, as well as for preparation (what-if scenarios) and training.