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A short account of the destruction of the indies analysis

A short account of the destruction of the indies analysis

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A Short Account of the Indies’ Destruction[2] (Spanish: Brevsima relación de la destrucción de las Indias) is a report written by the Spanish Dominican friar Bartolomé de las Casas in 1542 (published in 1552) about the mistreatment of and massacres committed against the indigenous peoples of the Americas during colonial times and sent to King Philip II of Spain. 1st
In the prologue, Bartolomé de las Casas states that his fifty years of experience working in Spanish colonies in the Indies provided him with both moral authority and transparency for writing this account.
[three] After presenting a study on the Indians’ extreme demographic decline due to hard labor and mistreatment by colonial authorities, Cardinal Cisneros conferred the title of Protector of the Indians on Las Casas in 1516. [4] Some clerics from the Order of Saint Jerome tried to reform those structures that used the native populace as laborers during Las Casas’ period as Protector of the Indians. However, Las Casas found that his efforts to preserve the Indians’ welfare were inadequate, and he returned to Spain in 1517 to appeal to the Spanish king. (5)

A brief account of the destruction of the indies full audioook

Bartolomé de Las Casas was the New World’s first and most outspoken opponent of Spanish colonialism. Las Casas was an early traveller to the Americas who traveled on one of Columbus’ voyages. He was so horrified by the wholesale genocide he witnessed that he devoted his life to defending the Indian people. In 1542, he published A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, a sho
Bartolomé de Las Casas was the New World’s first and most outspoken opponent of Spanish colonialism. Las Casas was an early traveller to the Americas who traveled on one of Columbus’ voyages. He was so horrified by the wholesale genocide he witnessed that he devoted his life to defending the Indian people. In 1542, he published A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, a chilling account of mass killing, torture, and slavery that demonstrated how Columbus’ evangelizing vision had devolved into genocide under later conquistadors. This passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish ‘Black Legend’ that would last for centuries. Dedicated to Philip II to alert the Castilian Crown to these abuses and demand that the Indians be entitled to basic human rights, this passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish ‘Black Legend’ that would last for centuries.

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Bartolomé de las Casas (c. 1484-1566), a 16th-century Spanish Dominican friar, historian, and social reformer, is best known for his Brevsima relación de la destrucción de las Indias (A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies), one of the earliest and most vehement criticisms of Spanish treatment of the Americas’ indigenous peoples.
In the decade after Christopher Columbus, Las Casas set out for the Indies for the first time (that is, sometime between 1492 to 1502). By 1510, he was protesting against Spanish colonists’ greed and the brutality being waged against the island’s natives. In 1515, he returned to Spain to campaign for indigenous peoples before the Crown.
Wikipedia [Public Domain] Bartolomé de las Casas (1484–1566)
The manuscript of Brevsima relación de la destrucción de las Indias, written in 1542, was given to King Charles V of Spain (1500-1558). The account was an attack on the royal conscience, full of frank and upsetting descriptions of torture and mutilation. While the appeal did not magically end colonial oppression, it did soften colonisers’ attitudes, resulting in the passage of the Leyes Nuevas (“New Laws”) the following year. The “New Laws of the Indies for the Good Treatment and Preservation of the Indians” were enacted to discourage encomenderos (landowners) from exploiting native peoples by limiting their dominion. Las Casas’ writings also sparked the Valladolid debate (1550-1551), Europe’s first moral debate about the rights and treatment of colonized citizens by colonizers.

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The subject of this month’s Illuminating Magdalen post is a true gem from the Old Library’s collection. This small book is a Latin translation of Bartolomé de las Casas’ (1484-1566) Brevsima relación de la destrucción de las Indias, which was printed in 1598. While unassuming, the book’s strong text and striking engravings discuss the nuanced – and hotly contested – issues of colonisation, European morality, and indigenous rights.
Bartolomé de las Casas was a Spanish friar who arrived on the island of Hispaniola in 1502 as one of the first Spanish settlers in the New World. As a result, he witnessed firsthand the violent treatment of indigenous peoples by European settlers during the early days of Spanish colonization. He also profited from it at first, using the encomienda scheme to hold Native American slaves. This regime exploited the indigenous people and divided them among the conquistadors, rapidly establishing itself as Hispaniola’s “primary instrument of Indian despoliation and exploitation” (Clayton, 2012: p.28).